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This clipart was downloaded from the Open Clip Art Library (OCAL) project because it was listed as Public Domain Image.

The website “Goodness Grows in North Carolina: Pork Outline” by the North Carolina Pork Council covers the history of hog farming and pork production in the State. The section “Commodity History” notes that hogs were brought to the region from Europe in the 15th century. Other sections on the website are “Regional Information,” “Production,” “Packaging,” “Shipping,” “Buying,” and “Nutritional Information.”

William Durrill. “A History of Hog Farming in North Carolina,” Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill June 25, 1982

Erica Hellerstein and Ken Fine. “A million tons of feces and an unbearable stench: Life near industrial pig farms,” The Guardian

Industry Spotlight: We’re Que’ing Up Pork Industry,” October 19, 2016

George M. Rommel. The Hog Industry: Selection, Feeding, and Management: Recent American Experimental Work: Statistics of Production and Trade. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry, 1904

All websites accessed July 26, 2021

The applicants were among the children whose father died in the war and whose mother died shortly after the war ended. Witnesses had grown up with the enslaved couple on adjoining plantations in Northampton County, North Carolina. They described how the couple was allowed to marry and ultimately had eight children. They also named Jacob’s enslaver, his parents, and his parents’ enslaver. They also identified Sarah and her enslaver Before enlistment, the 42-year-old husband and father worked as a hog feeder.

Minor — 393,113 / 292,364, Annie Lockhart etal

General Affidavit, Isaac Lockhart Gee, 28 May 1889
60 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, NC
“That in the year 1846 Jacob Lockhart … was a slave, the property of Wm. Lockhart’s widw … and that Sarah Ellis was at the same time a slave, the property of D.L. Ellis … [Gee] heard the said Jacob Lockhart ask for and obtain the consent of D.L. Ellis that he should take the said Sarah Ellis as his wife.”

General Affidavit, London Ellis, 28 May 1889
61 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, NC
“That in the year 1846 … this affiant was a slave belonging to D.L. Ellis … Sarah Ellis was … a slave belonging to D.L. Ellis … affiant was personally present when Jacob Lockhart asked for and obtained the consent of said D.L. Ellis to his marriage with said Sarah Ellis”

General Affidavit, L.J. Norwood, 15 June 1889
60 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“That he was born and had all his life lived in Northampton Co., NC That he knew said Jacob Lockhart and his wife Sarah Ellis before and after their marriage, that before their union, they were both virtuous people … marriage was about the year 1847.”

General Affidavit, William Bradley, 15 June 1889
“That he has lived in Northampton Co., NC for the last 60 years of his life”

General Affidavit, London Ellis, 16 July 1889
60 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“Has lived in Northampton County, NC all his life, that he was born a slave to D.L. Ellis until the end of the war was 1861-65 … Jacob Lockhart and Sarah Ellis (who lived on the same plantation, belonged to the same master, and whom this affiant knew all his life also) were allowed to marry.”

General Affidavit, Wm. Bradley, 16 July 1889
73 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“That he was a slave belonging to W.H. Gray who was a neighbor of D.L. Ellis, that he married a girl belonging to D.L. Ellis”

General Affidavit, London Ellis and William Bradley, 16 September 1889
[Ellis] 60 years
[Bradley] 73 years
post-office address, Garysburg, NC
“They were well acquainted with said Jacob and Sarah Lockhart … that no physician attended at the births of any of them, as in slavery times it was always customary to have only an old ‘granny’ woman in attendance, that they believe such midwife or midwives are long since dead.”

General Affidavit, London Ellis, 9 December 1889
60 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, NC
“That he knew Jacob Lockhart and his wife Sarah Ellis, before and after their marriage, that he lived in the same place with said Sarah … that he was present at the births of all their children, and helped in attending to their mother.”

Deposition, Annie Lockhart, 20 April 1891
about 30 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“I understand I was born in June 1862 … I am the daughter of Jacob & Sarah Lockhart. They are both dead. Jacob, my father died in US Army & my mother Sarah Lockhart died here at this place since the war, the year I cannot give.”
“My father was a slave of Joseph Lockhart & my mother was a slave of Daniel Ellis near this place. Both of them are dead.
“I ask a pension as the minor child of my father who was in the army. My brothers & sisters are:
Penny is the oldest,
Cornelius,
Samuel, he’s at Franklin, Va.,
Jacob, somewhere in Halifax Co., NC. Sam knows.
Nellie,
Nancy,
Bettie – Sam knows where she is, I don’t —
Annie – that’s me
I don’t know the ages of any of them. I was too young to know anything of my parents.
My father’s father was named Jacob.
My father’s mother was named Milley.
They are both dead, died near here. My father had no sisters or brothers.
I never heard of Mary Lockhart, do not know any such person. I never knew Henry Wilson & Moses Lester.”

Deposition, Cornelius Lockhart, 21 April 1891
43 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., Va.
“I am the son of Jacob & Sarah Lockhart. They are both dead. My mother died the 2nd year after the war. My father Jacob Lockhart was in the 1st US Col Cavly & died there…. My father’s father was Jacob Road [sp?].
“Penny was my oldest sister born some time before I was. I was born Sept 15th 1849; Samuel is not 12 months older than I am. He was born Aug 10th 1850; Nellie was born Nov 6th, 1854; Jacob came before her, he was born July 20th, 1852; Nancy – Oct 10th 1856; Bettie – Apl 20th 1858; Annie, June 10th, 1862. These ages I got from the older colored persons, they will be here, we have no better way of getting them. There is no record & I don’t know any white people who can tell you about our ages as all are dead who knew.”

Deposition, Nancy Lockhart, 21 April 1891
35 or 36 years old; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., Va.
“I am the daughter of Jacob & Sarah Lockhart. Both are dead.
“My grandparents on my father’s side are Jacob & Milly Lockhart. They were slaves of Col. Wm. Lockhart, near this village. All of them are dead.
“There were eight children born to my father Jacob Lockhart by my mother Sarah.
Penny — the oldest
Cornelius,
Samuel, P.O. Franklin, Va.,
Jacob, Sam knows. I don’ t know his P.O.
Nelly,
Nancy – that’s me
Betty, Sam knows her post office
Annie
I don’t know the ages of any of them.
My father had no brothers or sisters. I do not know Mary Lockhart, or Polly, or John Lockhart, never heard of them before. “

Deposition, Penny Lockhart, 21 April 1891
45 years old … “that’s what I was always told was about my age”; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“I am the oldest child… I am about two years older than Cornelius & there is about that time between each of us — two years.”

Deposition, Nellie Lockhart, 21 April 1891
“I am about 37 or 38 years of age”; residence, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“I never heard of Mary Lockhart or Henry Wilson or Moses Lester.
My father & mother had 8 children. … I do not know their ages, or the years any of us were born. All were born here in at Garysburg, NC.”

Deposition, Lewis J. Norwood, 22 April 1891
63 years old; occupation, carpenter & preacher; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“I remember Jacob Lockhart, a slave of Col. Wm. Lockhart. I also knew his wife, Sarah Ellis, she was a slave of Daniel Ellis, knew them from boyhood up…. I remember Jacob & Sarah Lockhart had eight children of which Penny is the oldest. I remember perfectly the day [they] became man & wife with the consent of their owners. That was in the year 1847 I am sure. I was married in 1849 & I know it was 1847 in that way, two years before I got a wife. Jacob was a little older than I was. I think they had been man and wife about a year when their first child came. Her name was Penny. Then they had a boy two years after Penny named Cornelius. There is about two years between them all except Cornelius & Sam and there was hardly a year between them……The parents of Jacob Lockhart were Jacob Rhodes & Milly Lockhart. I never knew Polly Lockhart or John Lockhart or Mary Lockhart. “

Deposition, William Bradley, 22 April 1891
76 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton, NC
“I was a slave of Mr. Wm. Gray, his farm was adjoining farm to Daniel Ellis near Garysburg, NC. I knew Sarah Ellis very well. She was a slave of Daniel Ellis & I had a wife also a slave of Daniel Ellis. So when I went to see my wife I saw Sarah Ellis. … I think it was at least 15 yeas before the war Sarah Ellis became the wife of Jacob Lockhart with the consent of her owner … They had eight children, Penny, Cornelius, Sam, Jacob, Nelly, Nancy, Betty, Annie. these were all they and & they came in the order I have given you. I do not know where they were born … [Jacob Lockhart’s] parents belonged to Col. William Lockhart. All are now dead. … Jacob Lockhart was some 42 years old when he left home for the war…. I cannot write my name.”

Deposition, London Ellis, 23 April 1891
60 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“I was a slave of Mr. Daniel Ellis who is now dead… Jacob [Lockhart] belonged to Joseph Lockhart I was right there & heard Jacob Lockhart ask Mr. Ellis to give Sarah Ellis to him for his wife & Mr. Ellis told him all right … they became man & wife in that way just as slaves were married in that day … I can’t read or write”

Deposition, Henry E. Pate, 23 April 1891
61 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, Garysburg, Northampton Co., NC
“I remember Jacob Lockhart very well, born & raised 3/4 of a mile from my house… [He named Jacob’s enslaver, his parents, and his parents’ enslaver. He also identified Sarah and her enslaver– Leslie]
“I knew all of the Lockhart slaves… [Jacob Lockhart] had no brothers or sisters…. I was my father’s car driver & I was with Jacob Lockhart a great deal as he was the hog feeder… Jacob Lockhart I heard died in the army… Jacob Lockhart was some five years younger or more old than I was. My father at one time was the overseer for Col. Wm. Lockhart.”


The text in the catalog record states that this map shows “fortifications, settlements, roads, railroads, canals, streams, swamps, and distances.”

The text in the collar states “Military Considerations — The N’th Carolina inland waters being in our possession, and NORFOLK deprived of the use of the Canals and her dependence now being upon the two rail roads for connection with the south, via Petersburg and Richmond and Weldon, it is a once seen from the map, that Suffolk on the Nansemond becomes the Strategic point for reducing Norfolk. There are two ways for military operations upon Suffolk which I will briefly notice; first let Fort Monroe & New Ports News be the Base of Operations, with Gunboats destroy the few batteries on the Nansemond, and land two divisions – one on either siede [sic] of the Nansemond where the turnpike is seen to come to both banks, about 8 miles up from its mouth: each division then marching by land directly upon Suffolk, one fighting its ways against the forces coming down from Petersburg or from those coming by way of James River; and the other division fighting its way against all forces coming from the direction of Norfolk: Out two divisions would then be able to occupy and hold Suffolk and we should have the Nansemond which carries 8 feet of water quite up to Suffolk for the furnishing of supplies by steamboats to our army at Suffolk.”

Though the soldier sustained a serious injury when his horse fell on him, he lived for many years. The chaos of these times is evident in witness testimony. The widow stated “I left my owner during the war, early part, don’t know the date and came to Suffolk, Va. which was then in the hands of the U.S. Army. I was there about a year and then Suffolk was evacuated and I came to Portsmouth, Va. and I have lived in and near Portsmouth, Va. ever since.” She later said “I drew rations from the government while the soldier was in the army. He got a paper from his captain and I carried that to the Warehouse near the Forty Wharf in Norfolk and got rations until just before he returned from Texas.”

Invalid — 737,873 / 549,035
Widow — 756,491 / 544,264, Martha Reddick

General Affidavit, Willis Murdaugh, 22 February 1890
60 years old; residence, Pearl Street, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That I have known the claimant … since his discharge from the service … near neighbors and seeing him very often.”

General Affidavit, Miles Carey, 22 February 1890
56 years old; residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I am well acquainted with the claimant having known him for 30 years … [and] by seeing him several times each week.”

General Affidavit, David Coleman, 19 March 1890
49 years old; Norfolk Co., Va.
“I have known the claimant ever since he got out of service, have worked with him on the material train”

General Affidavit, Charles Pierce, 19 March 1890
55 years old; Norfolk Co., Va.
“I have known the said Thomas Riddick from his discharge to the present time… ever since he came out of the service have seen him as often as 3 or 4 times per week and have worked with him”

General Affidavit, Thomas Reddick, 4 April 1890
50 years old; Norfolk County, Virginia
“It is impossible for me to get the testimony of the surgeons who treated me in the service for my disabilities and those who have treated me since my discharge because they have died, moved away so I cannot find them.”

For Officer’s or Comrade’s Testimony, Ives Smith and Nelson Elliott, 24 October 1891
“Reddick was a strong healthy man. … June or July 1864 in front of Petersburg, Va. [Riddick] was injured by having a horse fall on him and severely injured him on the left knee and left side … was injured very badly, was relieved from duty and finally sent to Newport News, Regimentl Hospital.”

Deposition, Maria Shepheard, 2 February 1902
60 years old; residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“We was raised together with claimant, hence have known her from childhood to present time … That she knowed [sic] soldier since 1865 … that she attended the funeral of soldier”

General Affidavit, W.H. Fisher, 12 February 1902
25 years old; residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That he is a funeral director and furnished coffin, hearse, and 4 carriages on the 11th day of December 1901 and interred the remains of Thomas Reddick in Mt. Olive Cemetery situated near the city of Portsmouth … Reddick died on the 9th of December 1901, at his residence 1437 King Street, that there is no City ordinance existing in the County nor no health officer’s certificate of death etc unless the body is carried in or through the City.”

General Affidavit, Ann Reed, 12 February 1902
56 years old; residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Virginia; post-office address, Chestnut St. near Griffin, Portsmouth, Va.
“That she knowed [sic] claimant and soldier before they were married, that she lived in the same house with her before her marriage to soldier also at the time of and a short while afterwards. That they were married on or about the 16th of July 1865, the ceremony was performed by one Rev. Thos. Barrett… that she was present and saw the ceremony performed”

General Affidavit, W.H. Fisher and Charles Sugar, 8 March 1902
[Fisher] 25 years old; Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Sygar] 50 years old; residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That they are well acquainted with claimant and deceased soldier, that they live near the claimant, and the said W.H. Fisher is the undertaker who conducted the funeral exercises and buried the deceased soldier….[Syger] visited and waited on deceased soldier during his sufferings from the paralytic stroke from which he died.”

General Affidavit, Martha Reddick, 26 March 1902
54 years old; residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 1437 King St., Portsmouth, Va.
“That she owns no stocks or bonds, nor no personal property worth mentioning, only a one half interest in the old house and lot owned jointly by deed to her and her late husband … The lot is worth about one hundred and fifty dollars it being situated in a locality where land is not worth much … [the house] was built about 22 years ago and no repairs except what was necessary for immediate comfort. “

Deposition, Martha Reddick, 15 November 1902
54 years old; occupation, housework; residence, 1437 King St., Portsmouth, Va.
“[I am] the legal widow of Tom Reddick … [who] died at 1437 King Street, Portsmouth, Va. on Dec 9th of last year (1901) of paralysis … [he] was born near Suffolk, Nansemond Co., Va. son of Rhody Reddick, don’t know the name of his father. His owner was Willis Reddick.
“I was born in Edenton, NC. My mother’s name was Judy Wilson, don’t know name of my father, he was sold away when a child. My owner was Tom Hoskins.
“I left my owner during the war, early part, don’t know the date and came to Suffolk, Va. which was then in the hands of the U.S. Army. I was there about a year and then Suffolk was evacuated and I came to Portsmouth, Va. and I have lived in and near Portsmouth, Va. ever since.
“I became acquainted with Tom Reddick in Suffolk after I had been there about two months. He was then still with his mother. He commenced to court me there, but I did not live with him and I was not his wife. I was known as Martha Wilson while there.
“I did not come to Portsmouth with the soldier. He came down about two weeks after I did.
“I had been in Portsmouth, Va. about two months when I was married to said Thomas Reddick, by Rev. Tom Burnett, a white preacher, in Newtown, a part of Portsmouth, Va. on Court Street extended. We were married by a regular ceremony, in a house rented by Reuben Reddick and two other families, the home was very large.”

“We were married in July on the 16th but I don’t know the year but it was 5 months before the said Tom Reddick enlisted in Dec.
“Q. The soldier alleged that he was married to Martha WIlson in Nansemond Co., Va. in 1861.
[The widow maintained that the correct date was the date she’d given — Leslie]”

“Q. Who was present when you were married or alleged.
Some 7 or 8 people, Scott Riddick, Mary Brinkley, that’s all who I know are living.”

“I drew rations from the government while the soldier was in the army. He got a paper from his captain and I carried that to the Warehouse near the Forty Wharf in Norfolk and got rations until just before he returned from Texas.
“I have my papers to show that I drew rations. The soldier sent me money, the last by Stephen Reddick, a Sgt in his company from Texas.

“I was his wife near 40 years. I had 9 children by him. I live with my children. Mr. Barrett who married us. came from Suffolk, Va., don’t know that he was pastor of any church, but he was a preacher.
“I have no property at all except a house and lot near Portsmouth in mine and soldier’s names. I don’t know the worth of the property. The house and worth much, about $25.00, the lot is worth and $100.00, I reckon….No income at all except from my labor and what my children give me.”

Annie Reed was present and saw us married…Scott Reddick and Mary Brinkley knew him long before he married me, and know that he was never married before he married me.”
J.M. Rutter, Portsmouth, Va. has attended to all the writing in my case. …. Mr. Rutter told me that Mr. D. Preston in Wash, DC. was my atty. … The soldier’s captain was Whiting. I went to see the soldier at Fort Monroe and Newport News, while with his company.”

Deposition, Stephen Reddick, 21 November 1902
74 years old; occupation, laborer; post-office address, Berkley, Va.
“I served as Corpl and Sgt in Co. K …. We always call him Tom. We were related, but we both belonged to the same man, Willis T. Reddick, of Suffolk, Va. now dead.
“Tom and I were raised together, enlisted together, and were discharged together…. I lived in Portsmouth, Va. for a while after the war and I went to see them at times.”

“I brought a prisoner here to Norfolk from Brazos Santiago, Tex., in 1865 and Tom sent some money by me to her, and I gave it to her, and I gave it to her in Newtown, Portsmouth, Va. where she then lived.”

I’m from the area. I’ve examined a lot of maps of Hampton Roads. Nothing prepared me for this 1780s map. This map is upside-down!

Maps typically place the north compass point at “the top of the page.” When that’s the case, the coastline of Virginia Beach is flanked by the Atlantic Ocean on the right. You’d find Portsmouth on the west side of the Elizabeth River and you’d find Norfolk on the east side of the Elizabeth River. But in this map Norfolk and Portsmouth have switched places and the Atlantic Ocean is depicted on the left

When you link to this map at the Library of Congress website, use the rotational arrows to orient yourself i.e. place north at “the top of the page.” You might also want to download the TIFF file for a clear view of the details.

Text from the catalog record indicates that this map is actually two sheets pasted together. Another digital image of the original is in the William Clements Library at the University of Michigan where it’s described as “Finished, topographical, pen and ink map showing the primary roads, rivers, and towns, with the namse (sic) of some plantation owners.”

Accessed July 12, 2021

A twenty-two year old undertaker. A built over cemetery. Witnesses from distant regiments. A sketchy attorney. “A man of sober temperament and good moral character.” A woman known as “Clotilda” and “Matilda” who “became accustomed to being known by either name.” Lives lived in Princess Anne County, Norfolk and Norfolk County, Virginia.

Invalid — 853,460 / 643,580
Widow — 1,075,249 / 818,917, Clotilda Randall

Marriage License [copy], James Randolph and Matilda Cuffee, 9 November 1891
Both born in Princess Anne County, Virginia. Both resided in Norfolk County, Virginia. The husband’s parents were Frank and Vina Randolph. The bride’s parents were Jesse and Clotilda Snowden. The license was issued November 5, 1891; the wedding took place on November 9, 1891. The officiant was Minster W.A. Butt.

General Affidavit, Emmerson Cuffee, 19 May 1893
about 69 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, Berkley, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I have known [James Randolph] ever since the war. He was in the same regiment I was in but not the same company…. I was one of his identifying witnesses and Henry Sivils was the other. Henry Sivils wrote his name and I made my mark…..All three of us, Randall, Sivils any myself put our hands on a book and W.R. Drury administered the oath to us. There were no other white men present. “

General Affidavit, Henry Sivils, 20 May 1893
52 years old; occupation, gardener; post-office address, Berkley, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I have known [James Randolph] since he was a boy….W.R. Drury was his attorney. I went with him to witness …. I signed my name on his declaration … I was sworn by W.R. Drury.”

General Affidavit, Henry Boone & Lewis Warden, 8 November 1897
[Boone] 49 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Berkley, Va.
[Warden] 56 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Berkley, Va.
“That they are personally and intimately acquainted with the claimant and have been thus acquainted with him for 20 or 15 years, respectively, That they have known him personally much longer than 15 or 20 years respectively. That affiants have been near neighbors of said James Randall in Norfolk County, Va. for 15 or 20 years respectively … he is a man of sober temperament and of good moral character.”

Deposition, James Randall, 14 May 1902
occupation, farming
“I was born in Princess Anne Co., Va. … was born in 1842 a slave to James Bright of Princess Anne Co. My father’s name was Frank Randall and he was a slave to [illegible] Randall. My mother’s name was Vina Randall and she was a slave to my master. My full and correct name is James Randall.”
“I was honorably discharged in 1866 in March the fore part. Was mustered out at New Orleans, La. and Brazos Santiago, Texas and finally discharged and paid off at Point of Rocks, Va.
“Immediately after discharge I came back to this vicinity in Norfolk Co. and have resided here since.
“I lost my original discharge certificate as I had gave it to a man named Brown to get Bounty for me.”
“(Pensioner is now 6 ft tall … black eyes, hair and complexion. Has a bad scar from a cut across first three fingers of left hand done he states when a child three or four years old.)”

“I was detailed as one of ten men from Williamsburg, Va. to go to Grove Wharf to stand guard and was on such duty 15 or 20 days. This was in 1864 during the summer.
“Our Colonel was Jeffrey Gerard.
Lt. Colonel … didn’t have one.
Major ” Brown and Seipp also
Captain ” Bowen
1st Lt. ” Mack
2d Lt. ” Moss
Orderly Sgt. Ward
I tented with Geo. Floyd and John Keeling.
“I was in the engagement at Chickahominy but can’t give date. Monroe Tripp was killed out of the regiment there. Can’t give company.”
“My witnesses were Henry Boon and Primus Banks.
“I was last examined by a Bd of U.S. [Examining] Surgeons last October at Soldier’s Home, Va.
“I had lawyer Reed of Portsmouth, Va. ….M.V. Tierney, Wash, DC, was my regular attorney.”

“My pension voucher and certificate are in my possession and I never have pledged either for a debt, loan or liability. Have been married twice. My first wife Emma Jane Fuller died in 1888 at Norfolk Co., Va. beyond Berkley. Then I married Clotilda Cuffee at Norfolk Co., Va. 10 years ago last Nov 9, I think. She had been previously married to Lawson Cuffee who died in 1871 at Portsmouth, Va. I have no child under 16 years of age”

Declaration for Pension, James Randall, 20 May 1912
68 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Berkley Station, Norfolk, Va.
“born August 18th, 1843 at Princess Anne County, Va.

Death Certificate, James Randall, 14 July 1913
He died of malarial fever — Leslie

Sworn Statement, Matilda Randolph, 5 August 1913
“Also personally appeared Miles Freeman, residing at Providence, Va. and Samuel McCoy, residing in Norfolk, Va…. affiant Freeman is a son of claimant and affiant McCoy has known said parties intimately for about 25 years.

General Affidavit, Matilda Randolph, 2 May 1914
over 60 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, R.F.D. 2 Box 123, Norfolk, Va.
“I was never married but twice. First to Lawson Cuffee who died at Portsmouth, Va. in September about 40 years ago or more, as my son by Lawson Cuffee was born about three months after his father died, and this son is nearly 41 years old….I remained single after Lawson Cuffee’s death until my marriage to James W. Randolph and I lived with him until his death … James W. Randolph was buried in a private burial ground near Providence, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That James W. Randolph was once married prior to his marriage to me… That I am unable to furnish death certificates of death [sic] of ) Emma Randolph, soldier’s first wife) or Lawson Cuffee, my first husband) as no county records were kept here when they died.”

General Affidavit, William H. Fuller, 2 May 1914
about 60 years old; residence, Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, Rt. w Bonney’s Store, Princess Anne Co., Va.
“That I knew Matilda Randolph before she was married, her maiden name was Snowden. That she was never married but twice. First to Lawson Cuffee who died in suburbs of Portsmouth, Va. about 40 years ago I saw his body after death but did not attend his funeral, but knew about his burial in Portsmouth where it is now built over. That Matilda Randolph was next married to James W. Randolph … She is a woman of good moral character That James W. Randolph was was never married but twice, first to my sister Emma Fuller Randolph who died three weeks before Christmas 35 years ago at Norfolk Co., Va. on the ‘Sharpe Farm,’ and was buried in Drury Branch Church burial ground in Princess Anne Co., Va. I attended her funeral and burial. James W. Randolph was next married to Matilda Cuffee.”

General Affidavit, James W. Fuller, 2 May 1914
55 years old; residence, Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, RFD 4, Box 59, Norfolk, Va.
“James Randolph’s first wife Emma Fuller was my sister”

General Affidavit, Willis Goodman, 4 May 1914
22 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, RFD 4, c/o J.T. Forelard, Norfolk, Va.
“That I was the undertaker [associated as a part owner of the firm of H. Norfleet and W. Goodman] who buried James W. Randolph in July 1913. I can’t remember exact day of the month. I had his body embalmed and I accompanied his body to grove near Providence, Norfolk Co., Va. where I buried him. The above undertaking firm was located at West Murden near Norfolk & in Norfolk Co., Va. Said firm partnership was dissolved in September 1913 since which time I am doing undertaking business at same place under firm name of [W. Goodman and C. Perkins, Undertakers]. That I had personally known James W. Randolph for about 12 years.

General Affidavit, James Cuffee, 7 July 1914
70 years old; residence, Providence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Berkeley Sta. Norfolk, Va.
“[We] were play children together … I served in Co. L 5th Massachusetts Cavalry, and as 1st U.S. Col. Cav. and 5th Mass. Cavy were brigaded together in Texas I saw this soldier often. In fact, our tents ran backs together … I have lived near neighbor to this soldier ever since the Civil War, and I helped shroud him when he died last summer.”

General Affidavit, Primus Banks, 8 July 1914
87 years old; residence, near Providence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Berkeley Sta. Norfolk, Va.
“Since the Civil War we have never lived over one mile apart … I attended his burial about one year ago and viewed his body after death.”.

General Affidavit, Clotilda Randolph, 1 September 1914
about 60 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, R.F.D. 2, Box 123, Norfolk, Va.
“That my correct name is Clotilda but I have been known as “Clotilda” or “Matilda” for years. I don’t know just why unless because of so many colored people being unable to read and write and names sound similar, and I became accustomed to being known by either name.”

General Affidavit, Sarah J. Baines & James Cuffey, 9 January 1915
[Bains] 60 years old; residence, Providence, RFD c/o Joe Bains, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Cuffey] 71 years old; residence, Providence, Berkley PO, Va. Norfolk Co., Va.
“That we were both well acquainted with the soldier James W. Randolph from childhood”

General Affidavit, Clotilda Fuller, 11 January 1915
about 59 years old; residence Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, Rt. 4, Box 59, Berkley, Norfolk, Va.
“That Clotilda Randolph and I were children & grew up together. “

General Affidavit, Clotilda Randolph, 15 March 1915
about 60 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Rte. 2, Box 123, Norfolk, Va.
“My first husband Lawson Cuffee never served in the military or naval service of the United States.”

General Affidavit, Matilda Randolph, 23 June 1915
about 60 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, R.R. 2. Box 123, Norfolk, Va.
“My husband James W. Randall died July 14, 1913. That if I stated otherwise at any time in my claim it was a mistake and not intentional.
“That to best of my knowledge my husband’s correct name was James W. Randolph. His name as James Randall in above service was no doubt a clerical mistake in pronunciation and spelling. This is the only way I can account for differences in names.
“I never knew soldier until after the war.”

General Affidavit, Jane T. Bain & Georgia Tatem, 26 October 1916
[Bain] about 59 years old; residence, Munden Town, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, RFD 3, Box 14
[Tatem] 41 years old; residence West Munden Town, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, RFD 2, Box 10
“That they have been well and personally acquainted with Clothilda Randall … for 30 years and 31 years, respectively, and that they knew James Randall, the soldier above named for 50 years and 25 years, respectively”

The Isle of Wight County, Virginia website hosts this map and several others. You have the option to click on this image.


I wanted to emphasize the degree of detail in Gilmer maps so I linked this image to the TIFF file on the Library of Congress website. Smaller files are available on the map’s main page. Text from the catalog record indicates that it shows “roads, waterwys, structures, towns and land owners, railroads and geographic features.”

The Gilmer Civil War Maps Collections at the University at North Carolina includes “161 maps representative of the entire southern region, with particularly large groupings of North Carolina and Virginia maps. Most of the maps are dated 1861-1865.”

The same map can also be viewed with other digitized maps in the USMA [United States Military Academy] Library Digital Collection that come from the USMA Library Special Collections. The digital image (color) is displayed upside-down — probably a human error. Just use the rotation areas to correct it.

All websites were accessed July 5, 2021.

The online exhibit at the Isle of Wight County Museum “highlights historical records as well as notable individuals and groups ​with photographs and items from the museum’s collection….The first recorded black property owner in Isle of Wight County was Peter Beacock. In 1772, he purchased 50 acres of land from Joseph and Anne Goodrich….By 1860, there were 1,370 free blacks living in Isle of Wight County. Many who owned property and ran businesses were lumbermen, farmers or watermen….​On Sept. 1, 1864, it was documented that several free blacks traveled from Fortress Monroe to sail to Smithfield for the purpose of collecting their families, and on July 4, 1865, a boat of former slaves traveled from Fortress Monroe to the foot of South Church Street to celebrate Independence Day.”
The African-American Experience in Isle of Wight County,” Isle of Wight County Museum, accessed July 5, 2021


The claimant injured hurt his back while jumping his horse over a fence during a Company drill at Fortress Monroe in Spring 1864. Years later his widow gave information his former enslaver and the couple’s nine children in her application for pension benefits. Witnesses lived in Isle of Wight County and Elizabeth City County, Virginia.

Invalid — 187,499 / 171,121
Widow — 833,152 / 435,444 — Susan Randall

Sworn Statement, J.T. Boutell, M.D., 7 August 1879
“I have known Moses Russell since 1875. He supports his family by doing odd jobs and sawing wood. The latter however seems to be too much for him & although he does a small amount of sawing yet most of it is done by his son. He has worked for me at times and I have noticed that he cannot stand much heavy work or lift heavy weights.

Sworn Statement, Edward Pleasants, 7 August 1879
resident, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Virginia
“IThat he has known the said Moses Russell from June eighteen hundred and sixty-five at which date Moses Russell was discharged from the United States Service, to the present day, that he has lived withiin one hundred yards of him from his discharge from said service to to the present day, saw him the day he arrived at home from said service, and has seen him nearly every day and night since coming out of said service to the present time . … “

Sworn Statement, Jerry White, 7 August 1879
resident, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Virginia
“That he has been intimately acquainted with the said Moses Russell since the 7th day of February A.D. 1866, that he was a private in Company H, in the 1st U.S.C. Cav. with the said Moses Russell … Russelll was injured in the back by the jumping of a horse while on duty … and has been living within two hundred yards of him all the time, to the present day, see him every day, and frequently visiting each other especially in his sickness … he was attended by Dr. L.D. Seymour, deceased, up to his death, which took place on the third day of November 1870 and afterwards he was attended by Dr. Boutelle of Hampton … “

Sworn Statement, Thompson Walker, 7 August 1879 [presumed date]
“that he know said Moses Russell for the last twenty years, lived within two hundred yards of of him all the time, frequently visiting each other …”

Sworn Statement, William Randall, 7 August 1879
“William Randall was a private of Company K, 1st Reg United States Cavalry and was personally acquainted with the aforesaid Moses Russell … [the claimant hurt his back] while in the act of jumping his horse over [illegible] fence while in the line of his duty in Company Drill at Fortress Monroe, Virginia sometime during the Spring of A.D. 1864 … he never knew the aforesaid Moses Russell to be addicted to intemperance or other immoral habits.”

Declaration for Original Pension of a Widow–Child or Children under Sixteen years of age surviving, 28 November 1885
“the following are the names and dates of birth of all [soldier’s] legistimate children yet surviving who were under sixteen years of age at the father’s death, to wit: Samuel Russell, born 1866; Lule Russell, born about 1874; Hattie Russell, born about 1876 [But it might be 1878 — Leslie]
“Also, personally appeared Agnes Crocker … and Andrew WIlliams … Hampton, Va.”
[Note: The date at the top of the form is November 28th and the date at the bottom of the form is November 30th. Both dates are handwritten — Leslie]

Sworn Statement, Thomas Brooks and Samuel Robinson, [undated]
“residing at Hampton, Va. … they were members of Company K, 1st Regiment of the United States Colored Cavalry … [Russell] was transferred from his company to hospital on account of said injury …”

General Affidavit, Eliza Nelson and Cora Hyde, 1 April 1890
[Nelson] 50 years old; residence, Elizabeth City County, Virginia; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
[Hyde] 30 years old; residence, Elizabeth City County, Virginia; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“That they are near neighbors to Susan Russell, widow, Moses Russell …”

General Affidavit, Owra Hope, 24 April 1890
40 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Virginia; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“I am well acquainted with Susan Russell and her husband Moses Russell … I live as neighbor”

General Affidavit, Eliza Nelson ____
44 years old; residence, Elizabeth City County, Virginia;
“I am well acquainted with Susan Russell … I live as neighbor”

General Affidavit, Milly Prentis, 13 February 1889
70 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City Co., Va.;
“I was presebt as a nurse for Susan Russell at the birth of Hattie Russell. She born 1878 and died March 6th 1889 at Hampton, Va.”

Sworn Statement, Susan Russell, 3 June 1888
“I was born in Isle of Wight County, Virginia about the eyar 1830 — at which place she continued to live until about April 1861 — with Dr. James Southall who was my master and owner. I first met Moses Russell in Smithfield, Isle of Wight Co., Va. about the year 1854 and was married to him about the year 1858 in the county Isle of Wight by Rev. Dr. Colton. Moses Russell at that time was a slave and owned by Wm. Willis Wilson of Smithfield, Isle of Wight Co., Va. at which place he was born. My maiden name was Susan [illegible] … I have had 9 children by him as follows: 3 before the war of the Rebellion, Mary M. Russell, Laura, and John Russell; 6 since the war, Julie, Hattie, Daniel, Russell; the remaining died at birth before being named. Moses Russell was born about 1826. He was a slave before the war and laborer after the war ended…. I have only three children now living John Russell aged about 28 years, Julie aged 12 years, and Hattie aged 9 years.”

Physician’s Affidavit, J.T. Boutelle, MD, 24 February 1890
residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.
“acquainted with said oldier for about four years … knew nothing [of Moses Russell] prior to 1875 or 1876 when I first knew him as a resident of Hampton, Va. and began to act as physician to his family. At the time he was in poor condition physically, doing odd jobs for a living. “

General Affidavit, Susan Russell, 27 February 1893
about 45 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.
“Julia born about 1878 and that Hattie is dead and Julia is the only surviving child of the soldier …

General Affidavit, Caroline Spratley and Elia Nelson, 15 July 1893
[Spratley] 52 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.; post-office address, Hampton, Va.;
[Nelson] [blank years old]; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.; post-office address, Hampton, Va.;
“That we have known the claimant since long before the war, that [they] were play children together, their owners living on adjoining farms … the only property [claimant] owns is a small house and lot, that she has no income other than her daily labor.”

Secondary Proof of Marriage, Susan Russell, 11 October 1893
“I am the widow of Moses Russell … my maiden name was Susan Pinner … was lawfully married at Smithfield, County of Isle of Wight, State of Virginia, by Rev. Dr. Colton … on or about 1859 … by said marriage the following children … John Russell, 30 yrs old; Lou. Russell, age 14 years. The former married and living to himself. The latter dependent upon me….The records of our County were destroyed during the war… I cannot obtain the affidavit of the party who performed the marriage ceremony, because he cannot be found and no doubt is dead as he was passed [sic] middle age then… husband died on the 19th day of November, A.D. 1880″

General Affidavit, Caroline Spratley, 19 October 1893
residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City Co., Va.; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“I was present wihen the claimant Susan Russell was married to Moses Russell which took place before the late war….Her husband belonged to the same person who owned me.”

General Affidavit, Susan Russell, 17 September 1894
about 50 years old; residence Hampton, Elizabeth City Co., Va.;
“That she has no property except a small house and lot which is assessed on the landbooks at this county as $200.00
… on account of her health she is unable to work”

Deposition, Susan Russell, 27 November 1896
about 56 years; occupation, laundress; post-office address, Hampton, Eliz. City Co., Va.

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