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Archive for the ‘Company G’ Category

The widow was so poor that she “she had to go North to do menial work to defray the funeral expenses of William Bright her husband.” After the death of her second husband, she applied for a Remarried Widow’s Pension.

Invalid – 1,094,307 / 818,955
Widow – 631,803 / 455,229, Mary Minerva
Allen

Deposition, William Bright, 5 October 1892
49 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 76 Nickerson, Norfolk, Va.
“[My attorney] is W.R. Drury, of Norfolk, Va. …. I don’t know the name of the man who swore me but he occupied a desk in Mr. Drury’s office and is said to be a Notary Public. … The man I refer to is a tall slender young man, clean-shaved except a mustache, and he some defect in one of his eyes…. My witnesses Henry Gordon & Nicholas Langley were both sworn by this man I just described.”

Deposition, Henry Gordon, 5 October 1892
about 70 years old; occupation, laborer; post-office address, Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant William Bright since 1868. We have been associates and fellow workmen during all of the intervening years.”

Deposition, Nicholas Langley, 6 October 1892
49 years old; occupation, watchman; residence and post-office address, 5 Salter Ave., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant William Bright from his early boyhood.”

Deposition, Philip H. Bagnall, 6 October 1892
50 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 14 Lodge St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant William Bright since his childhood … and we have been neighbors continuously since our muster out of service. I was a sergeant in said company.”

Deposition, Jasper Cornick, 6 October 1892
61 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 120 Nickerson St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the clt William Bright for the past thirty years. He and I served together … and have been neighbors continuously since our discharge from service.”

General Affidavit, Clarky Bell and Caroline Simmons, 4 April 1896
[Bell] 6 Byrd Street, (Barboursville),
[Simmons] 11 Chapel Street, Norfolk, Va.
“[The claimant] was a child when they first knew her … they saw her about two (2) or three (3) times monthly during the period of their first acquaintance with her until she became the wife of the soldier. They knew the soldier when a young man…They saw the soldier weekly or oftener throughout the period before he was married … They visited the home of claimant and soldier monthly on an average and affiant Simmons helped ‘raise’ claimant … “

General Affidavit, Margaret Anderson and Elizabeth Kindred, 27 July 1897
“That the claimant above described as no property neither real or personal, no income derived from any source. She has never owned any property of any description except a few articles of household furniture the value of which did not exceed $25.00 and the same has been disposed of. She has been without real and personal property and has had no income of any kind since March 1896, the date of soldier’s death as above described. No one is legally bound for claimant’s support but she depends entirely upon manual jobs for support for she had to go North to do menial work to defray the funeral expenses of William Bright her husband.”

General Affidavit, Joseph Nelson, 5 August 1897
citizen of Norfolk, Norfolk County, Virginia
“That he is one of the firm of Nelson Wilson & Co., who officiated at the interment of William Bright, the soldier above described who was buried March 11, 1896, at Norfolk, Virginia”

Questionnaire (Form3-506), Caroline Simmons, 14 September 1897
66 years old; occupation, housework; post-office address, 11 Chapel St., Extended, Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the clmt since a child. She is my stepdaughter and I partly raised her. Her maiden name was Minerva Simmons. I was not present when she was married but was living within a half a mile of her on Bayside, Princess Anne Co., Va. at the time of her marriage to Owen Bright, about 15 years old. I did not know him until a short time before he married clmt…. He died March before last in this city. … The said Owen Bright was also called William and Bill Bright. When I first knew him he was called Owen Bright. That was the name he gave my husband when he asked for his daughter the clmt.

“The claimant’s post-office address is 69 Willoughby St , 100 Nicholson Street, Norfolk, Va.
“There was no prior marriage of soldier nor claimant. The claimant was never divorced from the soldier and that she has not remarried since his death.”
Note: At first I thought “Owen Bright” was a scrawled presentation of “William Bright” but the person giving testimony said he was also called “William and Bill Bright.” Curious — Leslie

General Affidavit, John Lingen and Elizabeth Kindred, 28 September 1897
[Lingen] 658 Bute Street, Norfolk, Va.
[Kindred] 302[?] Queen Street, Norfolk, Va.
“That they are each well acquainted with the claimant … having known her more than eighteen years. They both were well acquainted with her before her marriage to the soldier above named. Affiants have always known her as Mary Minerva and this was claimant’s name before her marriage….the soldier above described died March 10, 1896 at Norfolk, Va.  [Kindred] distinctly remembers the date being a frequent visitor at his bedside during his final illness and she saw his remains in about one hour after he died.”

Claimant’s Affidavit, Minerva Bright, 28 September 1897
“… although her parents named her ‘Mary Minerva’ she was not called by the name ‘Mary’ not even by her parents.  He husband, the soldier, above described, always said he liked the name Mary better than Minerva and he therefore sometimes called her Mary and at other times Minerva … he applied for license to marry only in the name of Mary. After they were married he used both names Mary and Minerva for every one [sic] else called her Minerva.”

Claimant’s Affidavit, Minerva Bright, 9 October 1897
“She generally spoke to him and to others of him when using the name “William” as William Bright simply; omitting the “D” which stands for “David.” The soldier’s full and complete name was William David Bright sometimes written William D. Bright and at other times written William Bright.”

General Affidavit, Margaret Anderson and Josephine Wilson, 9 October 1897
[Anderson] 93 Willoughby Street, Norfolk, Va.
[Wilson] 110 Nicholson Street, Norfolk, Va.
“That they both knew soldier … before he married claimant. Affiant Anderson knew him for twelve years before he married claimant and affiant Wilson knew him for at least that period. The soldier was married to claimant in the house of affiant Anderson. Affiants both lived in the immediate neighborhood fourteen, fifteen years before his marriage to claimant and they were both personally and intimately acquainted with him all living in Norfolk, Va. and seeing him on average of once or twice weekly during the period named.”

Marriage Certificate, James Allen and Minerva Bright, 7 November 1897
The couple lived at 320 W. 36th when they married. Both were widowed. The groom was 48 years old; the bride was 37 years old. He was born at Old Point, Virginia to James Allen and Adaline. She was born in Norfolk, Virginia to James Simmons and Letitia. The officiant Granville Hunt lived at 134 W. 32nd Street; the witness was H.A. Hunt.
Note: The following text appears on this document “A Transcript from the Records of the Marriages reported to the Department of Health of The City of New York.” It was date-stamped as received by the Pension Bureau on 5 November 1918.

General Affidavit, Lavinia Robinson, 5 December 1897
60 years old; post-office address, 428 E. Bute Street, Norfolk, Va.
“That she has been acquainted with the claimant ever since she was a girl; that she was first married to William Bright; that she was not married after Bright’s death until she married Allen; that she and Allen were never separated or divorced but lived together as man and wife until his death and that she has not re-married since his death.”

General Affidavit, Hezekiah Anderson, 5 December 1897
69 years old; post-office address, 421 Powell St., Norfolk, Va.
“That he has known the claimant ever since 1877 at which time she was not married …”

Death Certificate, James Allen, 15 December 1915
He was about 50 years old when he died in Elizabeth City County, Virginia on 15 December 1915. He was employed as a laborer for “NNRR & E Co.” His parents were James Allen and Adeline Cooper, both born in that county. The informant Edmond Allen lived on Fox Hill Road. The deceased was buried at “AME Cemetery” on 19 December 1915. W.T. Smith and Sons of Hampton handled the burial.
Note: The “transcript” of this death certificate was issued by the registrar of the local Board of Health of Elizabeth City County on 16 August 1921.
Note: If the abbreviation “NNRR & E Co.” is for “Newport News Railroad Company” what does the “E” stand for? — Leslie

Declaration for Remarried Widow’s Pension, Mary Minerva Allen, 1 November 1918
residence, 609 Smith Street, Norfolk, Virginia
“[D]eclares she is 58? years of age, and that she was born 1860? at Princess Anne County, Virginia…That she was formerly the widow of William Bright … That she was married to said soldier …under the name of Mary Minerva Simmons … that said soldier died March 18, 1896 at Norfolk, Virginia … her marriage November 7, 1897 to James Allen at New York, NY that he died December 16, 1915 at Phoebus, Virginia …”

General Affidavit, Mary Minerva, 4 December 1918
58 years old; residence, 609 Smith Street, Norfolk, Virginia
“That her husband, James Allen, died at Phoebus, Virginia, on December 16, 1915; at that time she was living at Phoebus, Virginia, and remained there for about one month when she came to Norfolk, Va. to live and lived with her sister on Washington Avenue until August, 1916; she then went to New York and was in service and lived at 2111 Fifth Avenue until the 2nd day of July, 1918, when she returned to Norfolk and since then has been living at 609 Smith Street.”

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“I knew the soldier during the last five years of his life as a depraved and worthless vagabond …. I have thought it not necessary to lose and incur an additional expense of $3.00 to confront the guardians with the adverse testimony obtained. I thereby recommend the rejection of the claim as it now stands.”
Letter from H.P. Maxwell, Special Examiner, to Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, DC, 31 March 1897

 

Minor — 597,473 / —–,

 

Marriage License [copy] Stephen Balentine & Cynthia Jones, 11 May 1865
Norfolk, Va.; both, 21 years old; both, single; both born, Princess Anne Co., Va.; husband resided, 1st US Cavy (Cold), Co. G;  wife, Norfolk; husband’s parents, Stephen & Cloe Balentine; wife’s parents, Jack & Charlotte Jones; husband’s occupation, Private, Co G, 1st U.S. Cold Cavy; officiant, John M. Brown, Pastor, St. John AME Chapel, Norfolk, Va.

 

Death Certificate, Steven Ballentine, 30 June 1894
” … departed this life on the 21st day of September 1890, aged 50 years; that the cause of death was gangrene; That the death was reported by J.E. Riddick and occurred at the Almshouse …”

 

Declaration for Children Under Sixteen Years of Age, Daniel Smith, 16 June 1894
58 years old; post-office address, 262 Church St., Norfolk, Va.
“[He] is the legal guardian of Mary F., Joseph, Magzner, Lucinda and Rosetta … [Stephen Ballentine] died Sept 22, 1890. That he left no widow surviving him, she having died April 16, 1890. That the names and dates of birth of all the surviving children of the soldier under sixteen years of age are as follows:

Mary Frances March 16, 1878
Joseph Dec 21, 1880
Magzener Oct 9, 1882
Lucinda Mch 4, 1884
Rosetta Aug 16, 1886

“That the mother was married under the name Sarah Smith to Stephen Ballentine … Also personally appeared, Abraham Elliott, residing at Norfolk, Va., and Thomas Willie, residing at Norfolk, Va. …”

 

General Affidavit, Daniel Smith, 14 July 1894
post-office address, 262 Church St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va. …
Sarah Jane Smith, which was her maiden name, was married to Stephen Ballentine after the custom of slaves on the 15 day of January 1876 by a Rev. William Lewis of Norfolk, Va. and the said William Lewis who performed the ceremony and [illegible] Anna Fentress the midwife who attended the births of the children of Sarah and Stephen Ballentine are dead. And there is no public nor church record of the births nor baptisms of the said children in existence. And it is not in my power to furnish the testimony of but one who was an eyewitness to the ceremony. Some have died and others have moved off to parts unknown to me but I offer the testimony of two who were not immediately present at the marriage of Sarah and Stephen Ballentine but they were intimately acquainted with [them] and lived near neighbor to them. And visited them soon after they were married and to the day of her death.

“And I further certify that the above statement was written by J.A.H. Armstead  in my presence and only from oral statements to him on this 14th day of July 1894 at his office #251 Bank St., City of Norfolk, Va. … ”

 

General Affidavit, Lucinda Smith, 16 July 1894
60 years old; residence, Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, 262 Church St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known and I have been intimately acquainted with Sarah Jane Ballentine from her childhood to her death …. I lived near neighbor to her all the time. I was also well acquainted with Stephen Ballentine for 35 years before he died. He died … at the Almshouse at Norfolk, Va. …. I am well and intimately acquainted with this family and I do well remember the dates of the births of the children….”

 

General Affidavit, John E. Bonney, 25 August 1894
54 years old; residence, Princess Anne Co., Va. near Kempsville
“I have known Stephen Ballentine for 40 years previous to his death, lived near neighbor to him all the time in Princess Anne County, Virginia.”

 

General Affidavit, Manda Hodges, 24 July 1894
45 years old;  residence, corner Scott & Jefferson sts., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I have been intimately acquainted with Sarah Jane Smith and Stephen Ballentine from 1870 to the day of their deaths … [hers, 16 April 1890] … [his, 21 September 1890] at Norfolk, Va. and that they left surviving the following named children: Mary Frances Ballentine born on the 16th of March 1878; Joseph Ballentine born on the 24th of December 1880; Magline Ballentine born on the 9th day of October 1882; Lucinda Ballentine was born on the 4th of March 1884; Rosetta Ballentine born on the 16th day of August 1886. I was present at each of their births in the capacity of nurse…. They are all living and I see them frequently.”

 

General Affidavit, Daniel Smith, 16 February 1895
60 years old; residence, Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, 262 Church St., Norfolk, Va. … “that he was well acquainted with Stephen Ballentine … all of his life to the day of his death”

 

Affidavit As To Family Record Entries, Daniel Smith, 25 August 1895
58 years old; post-office address, 262 Church St., Norfolk, Va., 12 June 1894
“Their births and baptisms was recorded in the Smith St. Methodist Church in the City of Norfolk, Va. Said records was in the possession of Wm. Smith, Elder of said church and after his death on the 17th of September 1890, they were misplaced or destroyed, therefore there is no church record in existence. The name of Maglene are spelt wrong by the Clerk of the Court. It should have been spelt Maglene & not Mageline and Maglener….”
[Note: The birth dates in this document are the same as those reported above in Declaration for Children Under Sixteen Years of Age … 16 June 1894 except Joseph’s which appears in the Affidavit … 25 August 1895 as December 24th — Leslie].

 

General Affidavit, Daniel Smith, 10 December 1895
60 years old; residence, Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, 262 Church St., Norfolk, Va. … “The said Stephen Ballentine was born and raised in Princess Anne Co., Va. His age when enlisted was about 23 years. His occupation was a farmer. His height was about 5 feet and 4 or 5 inches. His complexion was dark. His hair and eyes was dark. There was no marks or scars on his body that I know of. His discharge certificate was destroyed by fire by his house being burned down. Stephen Ballentine was admitted in the National Soldiers’ Home at Hampton, Va. on the 28th day of August 1890 and he died at the said home on the 21st day of September 1890.”

 

General Affidavit, Philip Bagman and Willis Quickmore, 10 December 1895
[Bagman] 52 years old; 26 Cumberland St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Quickmore]  64 years old; 62 Chapel St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.
Bagnam “has known Stephen Ballentine for 25 years and he was he was the first sergeant of Company G with the said Stephen Ballentine … Quickmore was acquainted with the said Stephen Ballentine since 1856 and that he was a private in the company with said Stephen Ballentine …. {and they know that while in the service] Ballentine was frequently treated by Dr. Manley and Dr. Gray in the Regimental Hospital for misery in the head and shortness of breath….”

 

Deposition, Daniel Smith, 24 March 1897
65 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, 402 Church St., Norfolk, Va.
“I am the guardian of the minor children of Stephen Ballentine. … I knew [Ballentine] from his boyhood. He belonged prior to the late war to a Mr. Land. I think Bennett Land although it may have been Horatio Land and he used to  drive a dray in Norfolk, Va. prior to the war. And I knew him well both before he went to Norfolk to work and when he was in Norfolk. … he was not married prior to his marriage to my daughter… They were married in Norfolk, Va. but I have forgotten the date. Rev. Wm. Lewis married them but he is dead. I do not know in whose house they were living at the time of their marriage. Nor do I know of anyone that was present at their marriage.
“[The five children] are all under my care and custody as their guardian but I cannot give the date of birth of either of the said children as they were born in Norfolk, Va. about five miles from where I live and from where I have lived all my life. …. My wife Lucinda Smith was present when each of them was born. …
“Q. What is the correct name of the minor whose name appears as Magzner.
A.   Her name is Magdalene Ballentine.
q.  Have you had the care and custody of said minors continuously since the death of the soldier Stephen Ballentine?
A.  Yes, sir, I took charge of them before he died as he was unable to take care of them on account of his physical condition.”

 

Deposition, Lucinda Smith, 24 March 1897
55 years old; occupation, housekeeper; post-office address, 402 Church St., Norfolk, Va.
“I am the wife of Daniel Smith, the guardian of the minors of Stephen Ballentine. The said Stephen Ballentine married my daughter Sarah Jane Smith in 1867 or 1868. They were married in Norfolk, Va. in my presence but I do not remember the date. They were married by license by Rev. Wm. Lewis now dead. The wedding took place on James St. near Queen St. but I have forgotten the no. of the house in which they were married. I knew the said Stephen Ballentine since his youth … Joseph was born in Rogers Ct., Norfolk, Va. on Christmas Eve, December 24, 1880. He was 16 years old the 24th of last December. Magdalene was born in October 1881. She was 15 years old her last birthday. Lucinda was born March 4th 1884, the very day that Grover Cleveland was inaugurated President of the U.S. the first time and Rosetta was born, also in Rogers Ct. August 16, 1896 …. I give said dates from memory. Manda Hodges of Norfolk, Va. was present when said children were born. She staid right with my daughter when they were born and she ought to remember when they were born.”

 

Deposition, Harriet Bearman, 24 March 1897
43 years old; occupation, housekeeper; post-office address, Kempsville, Princess Anne Co., Va.
“I have knows [Daniel Smith] for about 35 years. I also knew his daughter Sarah Jane Smith from her early childhood. She and I were near of an age. I lived right by the family and was very intimate with the said Sarah Jane Smith from her childhood until she died … [I knew Stephen Ballentine] from 1866 until he died. I was not present at their marriage but I remember very well when it took place but I cannot give the date.”

 

Deposition, John E. Bonney, 25 March 1897
58 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, Broad Creek, Princess Anne Co., Va.
“I have known Daniel Smith … for the past 35 years …. I knew the said Stephen Ballentine for 40 years before his death. I knew him as a neighbor and as an associate from before he was grown until he died. I also knew his wife Sarah Jane from her early girlhood until she died …. They lived in Norfolk and I lived about four miles distant but I visited them frequently.”

 

Deposition, Henrietta Jones, 25 March 1897
70 years old; residence and post-office address, 190 St. Paul’s St., Norfolk, Va.
“I do not know Daniel Smith …. but I did know Stephen Ballentine who died in the Norfolk City Almshouse. I got acquainted with him on his return to Norfolk after his discharge from the army in the Spring of 1866.
Q.  Under what circumstances did you make his acquaintance?
A.  He visited next door to where I lived for a while and then he visited my house. He was then a single young man. When I first made his acquaintance he was visiting a girl named Lucinda Jones, my cousin who lived next door to me on East Main St. in this City and about two years thereafter he married this girl Lucinda Jones. I was not present when they were married as I had moved to Church St. and was living some distance from them when they were married. I do not know who married them nor do I know who saw them married. No, I don’t think they lived together but he used to visit Lucinda and she had three children by him viz. Alexander, James, and Eva — all living. No, Stephen Ballentine did not support said children. Their mother supported them until she died eleven or twelve years ago and then I took said children and raised them. The child Eva was only about a month old when the mother Lucinda died.
Q.  Where was Stephen Ballentine when Lucinda Jones died?
A.  He was living on St. Paul St. this city with another woman by whom he had the children for which Daniel Smith is the guardian.
Q.  Can you refer me to anyone from whom I may obtain the fact of Stephen Ballentine’s alleged marriage to Lucinda Jones?
A.  I don’t know for certain but I think Rosa Sparks and Susan Perry knew all about the marriage. They lived right by Lucinda when she and Stephen Ballentine were said to have married. They live on Suffolk St. near James in this city. Stephen Ballentine did not live and co-habit with his Lucinda Jones as a husband should do by his wife but he visited her occasionally and she had the abovenamed children by him. Yes, sir, Stephen Ballentine owned and recognized said children but he never provided them with any part of a support.”

 

Deposition, Henrietta Jones, 25 March 1897
70 years old; residence and post-office address, 190 St. Paul’s St., Norfolk, Va.
“I became acquainted with the late Stephen Ballentine in the Spring of 1866 on his return from the army. I was then living on Church St., this City. Prior to that time I had lived on East Main Street, this City, and a young girl, a cousin of mine named Cynthia Jones, not Lucinda, lived next door to me. Her parents were Jack & Charlotte Jones and were from Princess Anne Co., Va. This was about the close of the late war that Cynthia Jones lived next door to me, about the time Richmond, Va. fell, and I occasionally saw this man Stephen Ballentine visiting her (Cynthia’s) house but I did  not make his acquaintance for a year later. Yes, he, Ballentine was in the U.S. Army when I saw him at the house and I heard that they were married but I have no personal knowledge of that fact. … The night his wife died, my daughter (Rachel Jones) went after him and found him in bed with the Smith woman in a house in Rogers Ct. this City. He was not married to the Smith woman nor was he ever divorced from his wife Cynthia Jones. Yes, sir. Cynthia was known as Cynthia Ballentine, the wife of Stephen Ballentine until she died about 14 years ago. …. Cynthia Ballentine died at the corner of Hawk and Willoughby sts., this CIty.”

 

Deposition, Willis Quickmore, 27 March 1897
67 years old; laborer; residence and post-office address, 62 Chapel Street extended, Norfolk, Va.
“I knew [Stephen Ballentine] for at least five years before the beginning of the late war. He followed draying here in the city prior to the war and up to the date of his enlistment …  He and I enlisted about the same time [and served together through discharge and muster out] and came home to Norfolk, Va. together and we lived right here in the city together from the time we left the service until he died in Sept 21, 1890. I visited him at his home and knew him well. ”

 

Deposition, Phillip Bagnall, 27 March 1897
52 years old; laborer; residence and post-office address, 380 Cumberland St., Norfolk, Va.
“I knew [Stephen Ballentine] for ten years before he enlisted. He and I used to work together before the war. … If his name appears on the company roll as Stephen Ballenting it is a clerical error, as his name was spelled and pronounced Ballentine. There was no other man of the name of Ballentine or Ballenting in said company.”

 

Deposition, Phillip Bagnall, 27 March 1897
52 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 380 Cumberland St., Norfolk, Va.
“I served in Company G … I knew Stephen Ballentine of said company well, for ten years before his enlistment. … I do not know of my own knowledge where [Ballentine was born and reared] but I have heard that he came from Princess Anne Co., Va. not far from the Norfolk Co. line. I do not know who he belonged to nor do I know the names of his parents…. He married just before we started to Texas in the Spring of 1865. I saw the woman during service that he claimed to have married while in service but I do not know her maiden name.  I also saw her after our discharge from service and they lived together from some years and had some children and then he left her and took up with the mother of the children for whom Daniel Smith is guardian. He lived with said woman in an old house in Rogers Court and was living with her when his wife died. I think Jim Langley, Joseph Cornick, and Willis Quickmore will know of Stephen Ballentine’s marriage during service and will know of their separation. No, sir, he was not divorced from the woman he married while in service but just got wrong after the Smith woman.”

 

Deposition, Jasper Cornick, 27 March 1897
66 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 42 5th St., Norfolk, Va.
“I served in Company G … and [I knew Ballentine well]. I first met him at enlistment and knew him well from that time until he died nearly seven years ago….. He married in May 1865 Cynthia Jones, whom I knew prior to my enlistment. She was from Princess Anne Co., Va. and was owned by a Mr. Morris. At the time of said marriage our company was camped out in the edge of Portsmouth, just across the river from Norfolk, and Stephen Ballentine got a furlough to come over to Norfolk to get married and he did not return that night and when he returned the next day Capt. Wm. H. Carter put him in the guardhouse. I have seen the father of Cynthia Jones whom Stephen Ballentine married but had no particular acquaintance with him. His name was Jack Jones…. I do not remember the date of [Cynthia’s] death but she died here in Norfolk on Hawk st (St. Paul’s) near Willoughby st. She died about 12 years ago. I heard that Stephen Ballentine was living with another woman when Cynthia died but I have no personal knowledge of the fact.”

 

Deposition, Isaac Brower, 31 March 1897
60 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 45 Newton St., Norfolk, Va.
“I knew the late Stephen Ballentine from his childhood. He was the son of Stephen Ballentine and Chloe Ballentine, late of Princess Anne Co., Va. I also knew his wife Cynthia from her early childhood. Her parents were Jack & Charlotte Jones, also of Princess Anne Co., Va. I was not present [when they married] but I know that he lived with and acknowledged her as his wife for several years next after he came home out of the U.S. Army. No, I didn’t serve with him as I was in the Navy. …. They lived together for a number of years and then he got careless about her and took up with another woman whom I did not know and would not notice his wife. I heard that he married the woman he took up with and I am sure he was never divorced from his wife Cynthia. Cynthia has been dead 14 or 15 years now. ”

 

Deposition, Isaac Kellum, 31 March 1897
74 years old; occupation, laborer; post-office address, 165 Newton St., Norfolk, Va.
“I knew [Stephen Ballentine] well. We enlisted at the same time and place. … I also knew his wife Cynthia, whose maiden name was Cynthia Jones. I know that he married her while he was yet in the army, and just a short time before our regiment went to Texas in June 1865. They had been married about a month before we started to Texas. The said wife visited him frequently while we were in camp in Portsmouth, Va. just across the river from Norfolk …

 

Letter from H.P. Maxwell, Special Examiner, to Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, DC, 31 March 1897
“I knew the soldier during the last five years of his life as a depraved and worthless vagabond…. I have thought it not necessary to lose and incur an additional expense of $3.00 to confront the guardians with the adverse testimony obtained. I thereby recommend the rejection of the claim as it now stands.”

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“[The pensioner’s] first payment should have been $80 after deducting the legal fee, but through some hocus-pocus at the bank, W.R. Drury* managed to have the pensioner paid but $60, and then exacted an additional fee of $10. This disreputable transaction took place at Union Savings Bank, and is only one of many.” — Letter from Special Examiner to Hon. Wm. Lochren, Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, DC, 25 May 1893

 

Invalid — 718, 183 / 555,866
Widow — 1,072,276 / 820,697, Harriet Tate

 

Deposition, Mark Sanford, 12 May 1893
51 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 26 Avon St., Norfolk, Va.
“[Tate] never called me to be a witness. I have known him 15 or 16 years… In writing up my pension papers my name is sometimes given as Mark Sanford. My correct name is Mark Sanders.”

 

Deposition, Lazarus Tate, 13 May 1893
above 60 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 31 Fox Lane, Norfolk, Virginia
“I first applied under the old law in 1889”

 

Deposition, Willis Creekmore, 18 May 1893
62 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 62 Cottage Road, Norfolk, Va.
“In the Army my name was spelt [sic] Quickmore. … I am now pensioned as Willis Quickmore…. [Lazarus Taite] was in the same company. He is now living in Norfolk…. I was once with him before Mr. W.R. Drury who is now said to be in prison. It was three or four years ago…. I know in Texas we were all sick. I don’t remember [Taite’s] individual case…. I do know that he has been broken up with rheumatism for seven or eight years, but I do not recollect further back.  I do remember that he was often left behind with the waggoners [sic] , but I don’t remember now whether it was because he was sick or what.”

 

Letter from Special Examiner to Hon. Wm. Lochren, Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, DC, 25 May 1893
“I find that the pensioner’s first knowledge of this claim was after its allowance. His first payment should have been $80 after deducting the legal fee, but through some hocus-pocus at the bank, W.R. Drury managed to have the pensioner paid but $60, and then exacted an additional fee of $10. This disreputable transaction took place at Union Savings Bank, and is only one of many.”

 

Questionnaire (Form 3-173), Lazarus Tate, 30 October 1897
“[Marriages] Lived with Harriet Tate from about 1867 … lived with Comfort Tate (Comfort Richardson) before war. She married while I was in the army.
“[Living children] Eight or nine by Harriet Tate. Mary Lou, Emma Tate, John Tate, Roland Tate, Augustus Tate, Leroy Tate, Hattie Tate, Lillie Tate (several dead, not named). Walter Tate, Morris Tate, Rosa Tate — these three by Comfort Richardson. Don’t know dates of birth of any.”

 

Questionnaire (Form 3-340), Lazarus Taite, 14 March 1898
[Wife’s name] Harriet Taite; Harriet Dozier
[Living children] Three by first wife, all over 40. Seven by second wife.
Emma, John, Roland, Augustus, Leroy all over 16.
Hattie, 13 in April 1897.
Lillie, five years, August 4, 1897.

 

 A Transcript From the Record of Deaths in the City of Norfolk, Health Department, City of Norfolk, Virginia, Lazarus Tate, 10 March 1904 
“Date of Death, March 10, 1904 … Age of Deceased, 74 years … Birthplace, Sussex County … Cause of Death, Pneumonia … Place of Death, Norfolk Co., Va. … Place of Burial, West Point Cemetery … Undertaker, J.E. Edwards”

 

General Affidavit, Maria Hawkins, 18 April 1904
55 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va. … “That she is a daughter of Lazarus Taite by his first wife”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Harriet Taite, 27 November 1916
about 65 years old; occupation, washing and ironing; post-office box, 821 Roswell Ave., Norfolk, Va.
“I was married to Lazarus Taite here in Norfolk, Va., by Rev. David King, under the name of Harriet Dozier, that was my maiden name. I do not know the date of my marriage. Mr. Hubard** got the date from the courthouse. I have no marriage certificate. I commenced to live with him as his wife about 2 years after the war.  I met him the first week he came out of the army. I was with his sister on the street in Suffolk, Va., her name was Charlotte Parker, now dead. I was not grown then, I reckon I was about 14 years old. When I first commenced to live with him I was only about 16 years old. We commenced to live together in Suffolk, lived there some 10 or 12 years, then we moved to Norfolk. I could not tell how many years we had lived here when we were married. I had children by him before we were married.

“I think that I was born in Camden Co., N.C. or Sandy Hook. I don’t know the date of my birth, or month. I don’t know my age. My father was Major Dozier and my mother was Luvinia Dozier, Williams was her first name.  When I was a child I lived in Camden Co., do not know the name of the place. My father belonged to the Doziers and my mother to the Williams, I don’t know which Doziers. My mother belonged to a widow Suky Williams. When I was just a small girl I was sent to near Suffolk, about 6 miles from Suffolk, to James Decormice. I stayed there until about a year or so after the war, then I went to Suffolk and soon after that met Lazarus Taite. I was stopping with his sister and working for white people as a nurse girl when I met him. I was called Harriet Dozier until I commenced to live with Taite and I have been called Harriet Taite ever since.

“[He] told me that his home was in Sussex Co., Va., do not know what part, he belonged to people named Blow. I don’t think that he ever went back there after his discharge from the army.

“He was never married before he married me except under the old-fashioned law they had before the war.  He had a wife named Comfort in slavery times, he told me, I never saw. He never lived with her after the war, she was married while he was away, right in his mother’s house he told me, at the place where he came from, to a man named Paul Williams. I think that she has been dead 3 or 4 years, died in Baltimore, Md., so her Maria Hawkins, and daughter-in-law Eliza Taite told me Maria lives in Norfolk.

“My husband has one sister Malinda Guy living here, and two brothers Joe and Zack Taite who I think live in Suffolk. Maria is his daughter by his first wife, Comfort.

“Comfort was the only wife he ever had before he had me. I never heard that he had any other woman but we two.

“I never left the soldier, he left me once was 7 or 8 months then come back and lived with me till he died, near this city, on the old Ocean View RR, now in this city, Maltby Ave. I was with him when he died. I did not leave him, he left me. We lived on Fox Lane, in the city, then on Cumberland Street, and about 2 years before he died we moved to Maltby Ave., in the county, where he died…. He died about 12 years ago, in March, will be 13 in March. I moved away from Maltby Ave. that fall, on Pulasky street, near Highland Ave., I staid there the winter out, then I moved to Highland just around the corner, that fall a [sic] back to Pulaski Street, just across the street where I had been, was there about 4 years. I next moved to St. Paul Street, near Nicholson, was there 3 years I know, then I moved out on Church beyond Goff, was there part of the winter. I then moved with my son, Augustus Taite to Portsmouth, in 2 or 3 months he died then I went back to Norolk [sic], on this avenue, Roswell Ave., have lived here ever since….

“I have lived in the house with no one but my children, no lodgers sometimes, young women. I have a son living with me now, Roland Tate. My daughter Hattie Simmons, lived with me till about two weeks ago, most of the time.

“Q.  Who have known you well since your husband’s death:
A.    Nannie Reed, India Griffin and neighbors, one of them is Fannie Reed, have known me well and visit me … I have but one brother and one sister, they live near Oriental, N.C. My brother, Frank Dozier, lives across the river from Oriental and my sister Jane Dozier, lives this side of Oriental. I forgot to tell you an old man James Warren lives in the house upstairs, has been in the same house with me 8 or 9 years. He does not live with his wife. …. I got my age from my brother Frank. I don’t know how he got my age unless he got it from older heads, he is younger than I am, and my sister Jane is also younger. I got a letter from him and took it to Mr. Hubard. I think my brother said that I am 65. I don’t know really how old I am. I don’t know of any one who who knows of his own knowledge how old I am. I don’t know of no one who knows my age, to swear they know it. I have not lived near my brother or sister since they were children.

“Q. Who has known you since the time you became of marriageable age?
A.    There is no one around here that I know of except my husband’s sister Malinda Guy. I do not know if any of the people I worked for in Suffolk are living. I worked for different people. I worked for a family named Laster the time he was waiting on me, but I don’t know anything about them now, don’t know if they are living or not. I cannot name any colored people in Suffolk who knew me but his brothers Joe. and Zack Taite.

“I have made out my papers before Mr. Hubard …. I had two witnesses, Rev. Price and Epsie Minkley.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Willie May McNeal, 27 November 1916
19 years; wife of Philip McNeal, a seaman; post-office address, 530 Cumberland St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known Harriet Taite my whole life…. I remember her husband Lazarus Taite, but I was very small when he died. I remember when he died….”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Bessie Tate, 8 December 1916
32 years old; wife of Leroy Tate, a chauffeur; post-office address, 860 Johnson Ave., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known Harriet Taite since I was a little girl …. I married her son Dec 27, 1905 … No, I have never lived in same house as claimant, but have visited her, on St. Paul St., Pulaski St., and Roswell Ave., every week nearly, every few weeks, since I have married her son …. The spelling of the name is Tate not Taite.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Malinda Guy, 28 November 1916
75 years old; widow of John Guy; no occupation; post-office address, 315 E. Bute St., Norfolk, Va. “I am a pensioner …The soldier Lazarus Taite was my own brother. We belonged to old Col. Geo. Blow, in Sussex Co., Va. near a place called Littletown. …. My brother Lazarus left there when the war first started, he and my father John Taite….. I think that my father was a soldier but I am not sure. My father sent for us soon after the surrender and we came to Norfolk, and lived on Avon Street. …. He had but two wives. His first wife was Comfort Richardson. I grew up with her … [I first met Harriet in Suffolk] … Mrs. Norfleet had her working for her … Harriet was then a little girl … about 12 or 13 years old … She left my house when she was almost grown, went to live with Mrs. Sumler, and after she left my house she commenced living with my brother Lazarus … The reason my brother left her he told me, was on account of Walter Price, he was working in the navy yard, and Price would be at his house nearly all the time, from the time he was gone … I used to see him there any time … my brother thought that two of her children were not his, but Price’s children …”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Maria Hawkins, 29 November 1916
“I don’t know my age. I think I was born ‘a little bit before the war’; wife of George Hawkins; post-office address, 631 Fox Lane, Norfolk, Va.
“My father was Lazarus Taite and my mother was Comfort Taite, later Comfort Williams. She died in Berryville, Va. a year ago this month …. Her last husband was Paul Williams. He died in Berryville too …. I was brought to Norfolk in 1865 by my grandmother in 1865, my father was not there then; he moved there in 1866 … My father was Harriet’s first husband …. Price was at my father’s house a good deal when they lived in this lane of the time. He worked with my father and they seemed to be very friendly, never had any words that I heard of.  I have but one whole sister, no brother, my sister is living in Baltimore, her name is Rosa Williams, she was a baby when my father left my mother and she lived with my mother till she was married, so far as I know.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Nannie Redd, 11 December 1916
about 50 years old; wife of Junius Redd; occupation, laborer; post-office address, c/o Clarence Merrell, Princess Anne Rd., Norfolk, Va.
“I have visited her most anytime when I had time, she has visited me. … She is a nice, clean, decent woman. She belongs to a church, but not to my church. She has had a roomer named Warren for some time, also has women roomers, and she works all the time when able, takes washing in at home.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Nancy E. Hare, 24 December 1916
“I don’t know my age. I guess I am over 60. … [I don’t know how long I’ve know Harriet] but it was before I moved to Norfolk and I have been here 33 years …. I never went to their home and she has never been to my home. …”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Epsey Meckley, 13 January 1917
69 years old; occupation, washing & iron; post-office address, 759 Johnson Ave., Norfolk, Va.
“I am pensioned as the widow of Solomon Meckley. I have known Harriet Taite for over 25 years. I got acquainted with her when she joined my church. I never knew her husband…. We have a committee of 14 women in the church to which I belong. It is the duty of that committee to look after the women of the church, to inquire into any charges brought against them, and no charges have been brought before that committee against Harriet Taite. I have never been to her home about anything. Her standing is good in church. Rev. Richard Bolding [sic] is pastor.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Fannie Reid,16 January 1917
42 years old; wife of Henry Reid; occupation, laborer on a wharf; post-office address, 1019 Carrollton St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant Harriet Taite for 12 years, I did not know her husband, when she moved next door to me on Moseley Street she said that he had not been dead long. … Moseley Street is now called Highland Ave.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Leroy Tate, 16 January 1917
33 years old; chauffeur; post-office address, 860 Johnson Ave., Norfolk, Va.
“The claimant Harriet Taite is my mother. The correct spelling is Tate not Taite. My father was Lazarus Taite. I lived in the same house with my mother till I was married in 1905 but I have been at her home quite often since that time, go by to see how she is, and to see if there is anything I can do … I judge that she is about 65, from the best information I have or can get is my oldest brother, John Tate would be between 40 and 50 years if living.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), James Warren, 16 January 1917
“I do not know my age. I put it at 40. I guess I was about 10 years when the civil war ended. I was born in slavery times.”; post-office address, 821 Roswell Ave., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, laborer
“I first knew Harriet Taite about 10 or 11 years. I rented a room from her when she lived on Moseley Street, and I have been with her every since, except a month or two when she was in Portsmouth with one of her sons. I did not rent the whole room, her son Roy Taite, slept with me, we worked on the dock together.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), Walter A. Price, 18 January 1917
50 years old; occupation, minister of the gospel; post-office address, 1242 Calvert Street, Norfolk, Va.
“I first knew Lazarus Taite the second night he came to Norfolk from Suffolk, that was about 33 years ago. I was then a stevedore. with my father, now dead, and he came to work under me, I hired him. …. I went with him to get the license and saw Rev. David King marry them. He told me that he had a wife in slavery times, but I know nothing about her, had two children by her, Walter and Maria…

“We were partners in store business, on Fox Lane, he could not read or write … We had no falling out. I was friendly with him till he died ….
“I knew claimant’s father, Major Dozier, he died on Fox Lane. I shrouded him. I do not know claimant’s age. I think that she is between 60 and 65, not over 65. Harriet had 4 children when I first knew her, had some born here, in Norfolk, do not know how many.”

 

Form 3-289c (for typewriter), India Griffin,18 January 1917
53 years old; widow of Geo. W. Griffin; occupation, housework and washing; post-office address, 830 St. Paul St., Norfolk, Va.
“I first knew Harriet Taite when she moved across the street from me on this street, lived there about 3 years, then moved to where she is now lives, except a short time she was in Portsmouth. I could not tell the year I first met her, some 7 or 8 years ago…. I never saw anything wrong of her, she always acted as a lady, I have been in her house at different times.”

 

Letter from United States Post Office, Norfolk, Virginia to Commissioner of Pensions, Finance Division, Washington, DC, 20 October 1925
“My Dear Sir — This office has ascertained that Harriet Taite, 1530 Church Street, died on September 19, 1925. Respectfully yours, C.L. Wright, Postmaster.”

 

 

*Several pension applicants reported that W.R. Drury, an attorney in Norfolk, Virginia, engaged in unethical and/or illegal practice.
Suggestion: Enter Drury in the search box to identify those pension applicants.

**Hubard and Hubard was a law firm in Norfolk, Virginia. It handled a number of pension applications for this regiment’s veterans and beneficiaries. Suggestion: Enter Hubard in the search box to identify pension applicants who engaged an attorney from this firm — Leslie 

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The soldier’s wife was 16 years old when the couple married by slave custom in Mathews County, Virginia. She bore 14 children. Her application for widow’s benefits was supported by her son, her midwife, childhood friends, and her husband’s comrades. The widow made at least two transactions with Union Savings Bank, Norfolk, Virginia for legal fees.

 

Invalid — 908,892 / 723,692
Widow — 543,811 / 335,546, Eliza Foster

 

Deposition, Eliza Foster, 9 November 1891
45 years old; occupation, housekeeper; residence, 150 1/2 Queen St., Norfolk, Va…. “My said husband died at 150 1/2 Queen St., Norfolk, Va. on Friday afternoon November 6th, 1891, and buried on Sunday (yesterday) November 8th, 1891. … I was married to the soldier George Foster at Matthews [sic] C.H., Va. according to slave custom before the late war.  I was only 16 years of age when married and I have borne fourteen children. …”

 

Deposition, Lazarus Tate, 9 November 1891
about 69 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 31 Fox Lane, Norfolk, Va.
“I served during the late war … and knew George Foster of said Company and Regiment well during service and continuously ever since our discharge until he died last Friday, Nov 6, 1891 … the identical George Foster who served with me … ”

 

Deposition, John Bush, 9 November 1891
49 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 151 Brewer St., Norfolk, Va.
“He and I served together … I have known him intimately ever since our discharge from service … I’ve lived near them and his children and my children have played together…”

 

Deposition, Thomas Foster, 9 November 1891
about 70 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 112 Fenchurch St., Norfolk, Va.
“I was owned by the same man that owned [illegible] Isaac Foster late of one Matthews [sic] Co., Va. and we lived together prior to the late war and since George Foster come out the army. We lived neighbors here in Norfolk. In fact I knew him from his birth until he died last Friday, Nov 6th 1891. I was present at his death and I was present at his marriage to the present claimant Eliza Foster nee Cook. ”

 

Deposition, Ellen Collins, 9 November 1891
47 years old; occupation, housekeeper; residence and post-office address, 194 Queen St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known George Foster and his wife Eliza from my earliest recollection. We were all reared together in Matthews [sic] Co., Va. and have always lived together in the same neighborhood together. I witnessed [their marriage] … they were married by a colored minister named Tom Garnett

 

 Widow’s Declaration for Pension, Eliza Foster, 5 March 1892
“She was married to said George Foster under the name of Eliza Cook … 1857 by Rev. Thomas Washington at Matthews [sic] Co., Va. … the following are the names and dates of birth of all said legitimate children, still surviving.

Frank Foster   Febry 6th 1859
Oden Foster   April 6th 1860
Andrew Foster   April 8th 1865
Lauretia Foster    July 4th 1868
Fannie Foster   January 6th 1871
Willie Foster   February 8 1872
George Foster   May 10 1874
Lucy Foster   Jany 19 1876
Harry Foster   Jany 19th 1879
Samuel Foster   Jany 6 1885

 

General Affidavit, Mary L. Ryalls & Lavinia Williams, 13 April 1892
[Ryalls] 46 years old
[Williams] 49 years old; residence, 12 Scott St., Norfolk, Va. [Note: It’s not clear if this address belongs to one or both women — Leslie].
“that she was born and raised in Matthews [sic] County, Va. and lived close neighbors to the aforesaid Eliza Foster and knew she was married by old slave law and customs and by master’s consent to George Foster, that her name before marriage was Eliza Cook … [George Foster] died in Norfolk, Va., 6th day of November 1891 … [the claimant’s] following children are still living: Frank, Odis, Andrew, Lauretta, Fannie, Willis, George, Lucy, Harry and Samuel … Their knowledge is obtained from having known both parties and family well and was present and witnessed their marriage …”

 

General Affidvait, Harriet Williams, 14 April 1892
70 years old; residence, 13 Denby St., Norfolk, Va. … “that she has known Eliza Foster for the last 15 to 18 years and waited on her in the capacity of midwife three of her children, Lucy & Armstead who is now dead, also Samuel … that she cannot give the dates of their births except the last named one Samuel who was born on the 6th day of January 1885 at Norfolk, Va., Hawk St. All of the ages were kept but were destroyed by some means.”

 

Deposition, Frank Foster, 2 June 1893
62 years old; occupation, whitewasher; residence, 233 Cumberland St., Norfolk, Va.
Q.  Do you know Liza or Eliza Foster?
A.  No, sir.
Q.  Did you know George Foster?
A.  No, sir.
Q.  Do you know Rudolphus Bowden or Frank Foster?
A.  No, sir. I do not know any other Frank Foster in Norfolk. … I never knew a Foster who lived on Magazine Lane. Hold on, I did know a George Foster on Queen Street and knew him from a boy. I had simply forgot him. He is dead. Has been dead a year or more. I remember a white lady met me one day and said ‘My, Foster. I thought you were dead” I told her it must have been George Foster. No, sir, I was never acquainted with his wife. Yes, I think he had a wife and a lot of children.”

 

Deposition, Eliza Foster, 6 June 1893
49 years; occupation, housekeeper; residence, 60 O’Keef St., Huntersville, Norfolk, Norfolk County, Virginia …
“My husband died the month next to the Christmas month — that is, the 6th of the month just before the month in which Christmas comes …
“[The widow applied for benefits (and increases in benefits) more than once.  She was asked to identify those who witnessed one of her applications] … I had John Boush, Ellen Collins and Tom Foster and another man whose name I cannot call. They testified to George Foster’s service, to his death, to my marriage to my husband George Foster and to his burial before Mr. Malcomb. I had Winnie Moore, Mary Lou Ryalls, William Humphrey, Buddy Bolin, and Ellen Collins before Mr. Drury … Harriet Williams was a witness for me. She died soon afterwards. …
“[She was asked if she knew Frank Foster] I have a son named Frank Foster. I know a young man in Magazine Lane of that name. …
“… John White and William Humphrey signed [the same paper as Buddy Bolin]
“[She explained how she paid the fee] The four dollars was taken out in the Union Savings Bank, Norfolk, Va. and the ten dollars later was taken out of the same bank …”

[Note: Malcomb and Drury were attorneys who processed pension applications — Leslie]

 

Deposition, Rodolphus Bowden, 7 June 1893
32 years old; occupation, letter carrier; [Note: No residence or post-office address reported — Leslie] [Note: …“I am acquainted with Eliza Foster and have been about ten or twelve years. I knew George Foster, the husband of Eliza Foster. They lived on Queen St., Norfolk, Va. near me.”

 

Deposition, Frank Foster, 7 June 1893
34 years old; occupation, laborer; residence, 216 Queen St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I am the son of Eliza Foster and of George Foster.”

 

Deposition, Joshua Brickhouse, 10 June 1893
53 years old; occupation, wheelwright; residence, 120 Cumberland St., Norfolk, Va.
“I know one Peter Shepperd in Norfolk. …. I do not know B.A. Richardson, Jr., a notary public …”

 

Deposition, Peter Shepperd, 4 July 1893
55 years old; occupation, plasterer; residence, 250 Goff St., Norfolk, Va.
“I think I know B.A. Richardson, Jr. I know his father’s a painter.”

 

Deposition, Mary L. Ryalls,  5 July 1893 
about 40 years old; occupation, housekeeper; residence, 12 Scott St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have know Eliza Foster all my life. She is the widow of George Foster. I was at the marriage of George Foster and Eliza Cook. They were married before the war at Matthews [sic] Co. … . George Foster died about two years ago or nearly that long. I don’t know the cause of George Foster’s death.
“There are two children under 16 years of age by George and Eliza Foster at date of death of George Foster as follows: Harry and Sam. I do not know the date of their birth.”

 

Deposition, Lavinia Williams, 6 July 1893
about 44 years old; occupation, housekeeper; residence, 16 National St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have know Eliza Foster probably since I was 16 years of age. I knew her husband George Foster longer than I did his wife Eliza.”

 

General Affidavit, Harriet A. Diggs, 14 December 1896
45+ years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 118 Scott St., Norfolk, Va,
“[S]he has known claimant for about 30 years; that she knows her intimately and visits at her house occasionally; that she knew her husband, Geo. Foster …”

 

General Affidavit, Lucy Burrell, 15 December 1896
28 years old; post-office address, 18 Fourth St., Norfolk, Norfolk County, Va.
“[S]he has known claimant for over 20 years; that she has visited at her home and visits there now and her acquaintance is of an intimate kind; that she knew claimant’s late husband Geo. Foster up until the time of his death.”

 

General Affidavit, John Gordon, 15 December 1896 
37 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.; post-office address, 30 Byrd Ave. …”That he has known claimant about 20 years, that he knew Geo. Foster … knew the family intimately & visited them; continued to visit them after Geo. Foster’s death …”

 

General Affidavit, Emma Nickerson & Alexander Cooper, 28 December 1896
[Dickerson] 52 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.;  post-office address, 144 James St., Norfolk, Va.
[Cooper] 37 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.;  post-office address, 116 Scott St., Norfolk, Va.
“[They knew the couple] for over 15 years; that they knew her two children; Henry and Samuel are still living … Emma Dickerson testifies that claimant’s child Samuel was born on Jan 6, 1885. She knows this for the fact that she lived only a short distance from her then & from the fact that affiant had a child born just one month after viz. Feb 6, 1885 …”

 

General Affidavit, Matilda Burrell, 28 December 1896 
51 years old; residence, 44 Smith St., Norfolk, Va. …
“she was present when Harry, son of the claimant was born … January 1879 … she thinks that it was the 19th, that she remembers this date for the fact that her daughter was married in July 1879 to the brother of said Harry & Harry was born in January 1879, same year …”

 

Deposition, Eliza Foster, 29 March 1902
about 59 years old; residence, 93 James St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.
“My husband was born in Matthews [sic] Co., Va. at a place called Point Comfort. I was acquainted with him a year and six months before I married him. I was a slave to Tom Edwards (dead) and he was a slave to James Garnick (dead). We were married about a year and nine months before the war started and I was about 16 years of age when I got married. We were married by Rev. Tom Washington, a colored preacher, and he belonged to Dr. James Garnick. He just read the Bible over us and joined our hands…. He died on Queen St., near Bank St. 11 years ago the 6th of November. He died of the results of a deep cold that worked down on his lungs and was sick abed about a month. Dr. Thorn [sp?]attended him.

“Since his death I have lived at Queen St. where he died, thence to Kent near Salter, thence to Liberty St., No. 13, living there about [illegible] years, thence to 93 James St. and I have lived there ever since with my daughter Lillie Wilson. These were the following children under 16 born to me by soldier, at his death. Lucy who was 13 years old when her father died. Her birthday was Jan 19. Harry was born January 6, 1879  Samuel was born January 6, 1885 … I have all the ages of my children on a piece of paper and can’t recollect. I lost the paper. My witnesses were Harriet Williams (dead) and John Bush (dead), and John Gardner (dead).”

 

Letter from Eliza Foster [on letterhead of Hubard and Hubard, Attorneys-at-Law, 145 Bank Street, Norfolk, Virginia] to Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, DC, 20 September 1916
“I am pensioned under the above certificate number because of the service of the soldier named. I was his wife during the Civil War.
“I am entitled to the increase of pension provided by the first section of the act of September 16, 1916.
“Eliza Foster, 733 Freemont St., Norfolk, Va.”

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This North Carolina mother sent two sons (John Sawyer and Frederick Sawyer) and two stepsons (Anderson Roberts and Solomon Roberts) to Union Service.  Her former owner contributed to her support until Emancipation and then served as her attorney in this claim. She had been her attorney’s nursemaid in his infancy.
Ultimately, it took an Act of Congress — a private bill passed in 1885 — for Nelly Roberts to receive a mother’s pension.

 

Mother — 228,253 / 212, 899, Nelly Roberts 

 

Declaration for an Original Pension for a Mother,  Nelly Roberts, 29 September 1876
about 63 years old; “… her second husband Thos. Roberts died in 1869 aged about 66 years… she hereby appoints William E. Bond of Edenton, Chowan Co., N.C.  her attorney to prosecute the above claim; that her residence is … Oaklawn street, in the town Edenton … Also personally appeared Chas. G. Manning … residing in King street, in Edenton, N.C. and James H. Manning … residing in Main street, in Edenton, N.C.”

 

Sworn Statement, Nelson Underhill, 2 October 1876
“I, Nelson Underhill, do hereby testify that I enlisted in the U.S. Service in Co. D 2nd Reg US Cold Cavalry that I knew Fred Sawyer well, knew him to be the son of Nelly Roberts … that Fred Sawyer was a carpenter … that [Nelly Roberts] is about 63 or 65 years old, very poor & infirm; has no property worth mentioning except a small house & lot … ”

 

Sworn Statement, John Sawyer, 8 January 1877
“I, John Sawyer, 2nd Sergeant, of Company E (Capt. William A. Cutler) 37th Reg US Cold Infantry, do hereby testify that I enlisted in the U.S. Service in March 1864 & my brother Fred Sawyer (or Bond) (he was known by both names) enlisted in Co G 1st US Cold Cavalry, & that he died in the service of sickness contracted in the line of his duty during the month of July 1864.
“I further testify that both myself & my brother Fred Sawyer (or Bond) formerly belonged to Mr. Wm. E. Bond now living in Edenton, N.C. & that we were the sons of Nelly Roberts (still living) by her first husband, Edmund Sawyer. I further testify that my brother Fred Sawyer (or Bond) was a young man, just grown, a house carpenter by occupation & had never been married. I am perfectly sure of his enlistment & death in the 1st Reg C Cavalry — am not certain as to the company but think he served in Co G. I know he was never married …”

 

Sworn Statement, Major Warren, 13 January 1877
“I, Major Warren, do hereby testify that during the war of the rebellion, I enlisted in Co A (Capt. Dye) 1st Reg Cold Cavalry; that I knew Fred Sawyer (or Bond) well both before & during his service knew him to be the son of Nelly Roberts, then & still living in Edenton, N.C….”

 

Sworn Statement, Israel Sutton, 13 January 1877
“I, Israel Sutton, do hereby testify that I enlisted during the war of the rebellion, became Sergeant in Co. I, 1st Reg US C Cavalry (Col. J. Garrard); that I knew Fred Sawyer (or Bond) … I further testify that I am not related to Nelly Roberts, the mother of Fred Sawyer – do not even know her, & that I have no interest, direct or contingent, in her claim …”

 

Sworn Statement, Ransome Gregory, 13 January 1877
“I, Ransome Gregory … am not related to Nelly Roberts … ”

 

Sworn Statement, Nelly Roberts, 15 February 1877
“I, Nelly Roberts, formerly Nelly Sawyer, mother of Frederick Sawyer (or Bond) … do hereby certify that my first husband, Edmund Sawyer, the father of my son, Fred, died in 1846; that I was married to Thomas Roberts in 1848; that my husband Thos. Roberts died in 1869; & that I have since been & now am a widow….”

 

Sworn Statement, Charles G. Manning & Henry A. Bond, 15 February 1877
“We, Charles G. Manning & Henry A. Bond, do hereby testify that we have known Nelly Roberts; that she was the wife of Edmund Sawyer the father of Frederick Sawyer; that after the death of said Edmund Sawyer, been since she was married to Thos. Roberts, & that she has been since the death of her second husband & still is a widow.”

 

Sworn Statement, Glascow Roberts & Mustapha McDonald, 15 February 1877
“We, Glascow Roberts & Mustapha McDonald … have known Nelly Roberts many years; that she was the wife of Edmund Sawyer up to his death, which took place in 1846; that in 1848 she was married to Thos. Roberts, who died in 1869 … ”

 

Sworn Statement, Nelly Roberts, 26 February 1878
“I, Nelly Roberts, the mother of Frederick (or Fred) Sawyer) decd do hereby testify that during the time my said son was in the military service of the United States, & up to his death, except two small sums of money sent to me by him, as opportunity offered, I was supported by my owner, Wm. E. Bond, who supplied my necessary wants till emancipation went into effect. I lived with my former owner till the 14th of January 1866. The two sums of money above referenced, sent to me by my son during the time of his service, amounted to six dollars to the best of my recollection.”

 

Letter from William E. Bond, Edenton, North Carolina to Hon. J.A. Bunting [?], Commissioner of Pensions, 27 February 1878
“She raised four sons for the Union services, two sons John & Frederick Sawyer, and two stepsons (sons of her last husband Thos. Roberts by a former wife), Anderson & Solomon Roberts, both of whom were raised by the claimant from early childhood. All four went into the U.S. Service. Fred died therein. Anderson was reported to have been killed in the bloody conflict which took place on the explosion of the mine near Richmond. Nothing has since been heard of Solomon. As he was in the same company and kept with Anderson it is very probable that he fell in the same conflict … the sheriff is threatening to sell some of her little property for taxes …”

 

Declaration for an Original Pension for a Mother, Nelly Roberts, 25 June 1880
69 years old; residence, Edenton, Chowan Co., N.C.; post-office address, Edenton, Chowan Co., N.C.
“that her husband … Edward Sawyer died in 1846, aged about 33 years; after his death she married in 1848 Thomas Roberts who died in 1869 and she has remained a widow ever since … she hereby appoints William E. Bond her attorney …
“Also personally appeared Thos. M. Small, residing in Edenton, N.C. and J.R. McCurdy, residing in Edenton, N.C.

 

Sworn Statement, William E. Bond, 17 January 1884
“I have known Nelly Roberts for many years and her son Fred Sawyer or Bond all his life; that I also knew her late husband and Thomas Roberts for many years; that Thomas  Roberts belonged to Thomas D. Warren, who has been dead for several years
“1 — As to Thomas Roberts, that about the year 1859 or 1860 he became very sickly and infirm; that he had no income except by his labor as a carpenter; that from that time Nelly Roberts was dependent for her support upon her son Fred Sawyer with what she received from me as a compensation for her labor.
“2 — As to Fred Sawyer (or Bond) that he contributed as far as he was able to his mother’s support providing as far as he can for her the necessaries of life; that I know on many occasions of him giving her clothing and food; that I knew of his sending money three or four times during the years 1862 & 1863; and during the time he was in the United States service; that I forwarded one of his letters (containing money, mailed from Norfolk, Va.) to file as part of the proof in her claim; and that he left no wife or child
“3 — As to Nelly Roberts, that she furnished four soldiers to the Union service, two sons and two stepsons (raised by her from infancy); that one of her sons, Fred Sawyer, and both stepsons (Anderson & Solomon Roberts) lost their lives in the service; that since her son’s death she has been dependent upon her own labor for her support; and that she is now very old, very poor, and very infirm.
“I further certify that in a pensioner affidavit I stated ‘that during her son’s absence in the U.S. Service, the said Nelly Roberts was supported by her husband and myself,’ by which I meant that her husband did all he could for her in his sickly condition, and that I contributed more to her support than a reasonable compensation for her service would have demanded because she was my nurse in my infancy (over sixty years ago) and endeared to me; that I am not related to her as an old and faithful servant, and have no interest or connection with her claim except as an act of justice and humanity …”

 

Note: Frederick Sawyer’s Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) shows that he enlisted January 1864 and died July 1864.
— Compiled military service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served with the United States Colored Troops [microform]: 1st through 5th United States Colored Cavalry, 5th Massachusetts Cavalry (Colored), 6th United States Colored Cavalry (1997). Reel 0012 – 1st United States Colored Cavalry: Sample, Abraham (Abram) – Smith, Ives (online at  https://archive.org/details/compiledmili0012akesunit/mode/2up).

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Although this application has almost no personal information about the soldier, the affiants and deponents give valuable “time and place” information about themselves.

 

Invalid — 996,413 / —–

 

Claimant’s Affidavit, John Baxter, 18 September 1891
67 years old; residence and post-office address, Great Bridge, Norfolk Co., Va. … “I received the wound on my head at a place called Bermuda Hundred on James River, Va. engaged in a fight and wound on my forehead which I received in a fight near Petersburg, Va. My officers’ names were Col. Gurod, Maj. Brown, & Capt. Collins.”

 

Proof of Incurrence of Disability, Reuben Wilson, 1 February 1891
45 years old; residence, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va. … “states he was present when the said John Baxter got shot in the right side of the head and right arm …”

 

Proof of Incurrence of Disability, Abner Lamb, 1 February 1891
45 years old; residence, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va. … “states that he was present under the same command in Company A, 1st USC Cavalry commanded by Capt. Charles Dye …”

 

Proof of Incurrence of Disability, Wilson A. Parsons, 13 February 1892
49 years old; residence, Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, Princess Anne Court House,  Va.  … “While engaged in battle he received a wound in right side of head rendering him unfit for duty. He was sent to hospital at Fort Monroe where he remained some time then re-joined his command and served balance of war although he continued to suffer from effects of said wound … deponent further states, that he is well acquainted with the claimant, having known him for 30 years …”

 

Proof of Incurrence of Disability, Edward P. Parsons, 13 February 1892
50 years old; residence, 11 Wise St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va. Princess Anne Co., Va.; post-office address, … “He is well acquainted with the claimant having known him for about 30 years …”

 

General Affidavit, Nundas [?] Parsons & Willson Parsons, 16 May 1892
[N. Parsons] 54 years old; residence and post-office address, Norfolk, Princess Anne Co., Va. [sic]
[W. Parsons] 52 years old; residence and post-office address, Princess Anne Co., Va.
“They state they have been in the presents [sic] of John Baxter as often as twice and three times a month and have noticed his condition and know he are [sic] suffering with his head and rheumatism … they have lived within three miles of the said John Baxter since discharge and have worked with him often times and seen his condition and knows he is fully disabled from proforming [sic] manual labor … he is fully disabled to care for himself …”

 

Proof of Incurrence of Disability, John Webster, 22 June 1892
50 years old; residence, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va. … “being a member of the same command … and have worked with [Baxter] him since discharge up to the present time … deponent further states that he is well acquainted with the claimant, having known him for about 30 years … ”

 

Proof of Incurrence of Disability, John Godfrey, 22 June 1892
67 years old; residence, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va. … “being a member of the same command … and have seen him since discharge and worked with him. … is well acquainted with [Baxter] having known him for about 30 years … ”

 

General Affidavit, John Godfrey & Reuben Bright, 30 November 1892
[Godfrey] 63 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Bright] 43 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
“States that they were members of the same regiment with John Baxter, Private of Company G, 1st USC Cavalry and knows the said John Baxter received a wound from the 29th day of September 1864 in the forehead at Deep Bottom, Va. …. [Baxter] lives by the charity of friends. This facto is personally known to them by living near neighbors of him ever since discharged and worked with him when he could work often times.”

 

General Affidavit, John Winston & Abner Lamb, 10 December 1892
[Winston] 51 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Lamb] 47 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
“States that they were members of the same regiment with John Baxter … and knows he received a wound in the forehead … and he also contracted rheumatism in the service … he is in a suffering condition … they have lived near neighbors of him ever since discharge and worked with him often when he could work and see him daily and know he is fully disabled …”

 

Letter from John Baxter, Hickory, Norfolk, Co., Va. to L.C. Wood, Attorney, 26 March 1894
“If it was not for the help of others I would have to be sent to the poorhouse because I cannot do manual labor for a support….”

 

General Affidavit, Calvin Smith & Isaiah P. Cuffee, 10 December 1892
[Smith] 38 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Cuffee] 38 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
“They have been acquainted with [Baxter] from discharge up to the present time and know he is totally disabled to earn a support by manual labor and he only lives by the charity of others for support. This fact derives from personal knowledge living near neighbors and see him daily, weekly, monthly, yearly and know his condition from discharge until the present …”

 

General Affidavit, Lewis Sivils & Edward Cuffee, 20 July 1895
[Sivils] 63 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Cuffee] 53 years old; residence and post-office address, Hickory, Norfolk Co., Va.
“Each one states for himself — say they have been living near neighbors of [Baxter] for several years … he can scarcely walk about the house … he is almost fully helpless …”

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The soldier, born enslaved in Mathews County, Virginia, was brought to Norfolk as a child and hired out to cart bricks. In adulthood, he loaded and unloaded grain at the wharves. The widow’s application contained several inconsistencies so the attorney (a female) and the notary (a Howard University student) were deposed. The attorney noted the difficulty in finding witnesses outside of Washington, DC who could read and write.

 

Invalid — 724,166 / —–
Widow — 506,855 / 407,149, Catharine Billups

 

Deposition, Catharine Billups, 15 January 1895
49 years old; occupation, housekeeper; residence and post-office address, 142 St. Paul st., Norfolk, Va.
“I have two applications for pension on file, one under the new law and one under the old law, in which I claim pension as the widow and as the dependent widow of Henry Billups, late of Co. G, 1st USCC
“Q. Where were you born and reared?
A.  I was born and reared the slave of Wilson Land of Princess Anne Co., Va. but I lived here in Norfolk eight years before the late war commenced. My maiden name was Catharine Webb. My mother (dead) was Katy Webb and my father was Jack Webb (dead).
Q.  Where was your late husband born and reared?
A.  He was born and reared in Mathews Co., Va. and he was owned by a man named Brooks whose first name I have forgotten. I know these facts from hearing my said husband relate them. I have never been in Matthews [sic] County, Va.
Q. When and where did you first meet the said Henry Billups?
A.  I met him here in Norfolk, Va. a year or two before the late war commenced. He was hired by his owner to a Mr. Noe who made brick at Norfolk. Mr. Noe died long ago. I was living at the time I made my husband’s acquaintance with Mr. Peter Whitehurst of this city, who died several years ago.
Q. When and where did you marry the said Henry Billups?
A.  I married him here in Norfolk on Chapel st. the same year that the war broke out. I was hired to a Mrs. Jones, a northern woman living on Chapel st between Cove and Holt sts. I don’t know what became of Mrs. Jones nor do I remember the number on Chapel st. where she lived. No, fighting had not commenced when we were married but soldiers were being recruited to go to war at the time we were married. We were married in the summertime, don’t remember the month or year. No, we did not have a license as license was not granted to colored people at that time. We had a minister or other person authorized to solemnize the right of matrimony to join us in marriage. We just got the permission of masters to our union and then we had a little supper to which we invited some of our friends. My aunt Charity Land gave us the wedding supper but she is dead.
Q. Give me the names and addresses of persons who were present at your wedding supper.
A.  I only remember of but one person now living who attended that supper and that is Mary Huggins who is now living in the state or city of N.Y. I do not know her address.
Q.  Where did you live from the date of your marriage until Henry Billups enlisted?
A.  We moved into the kitchen on Main st this city of a Mrs. Lizzie Jones and we lived there until Henry Billups enlisted and I continued to live there until after his discharge and return from the army. I had two children born there.
Q.  Had you been previously married or had you lived with any man as his wife prior to your marriage to Henry Billups?
A.  Neither …
Q.  How long did Henry Billups live with you after he came out of the army?
A.  He lived with me until he entered the Hampton Soldiers Home and after entering that Home he frequently visited me and my our [sic] daughter now Mrs. Mary Williams visited him at the home. I don’t remember the date we first visited him at the Home. We were living on National Lane, this city, when he went to the Home. Toler Bagnall can tell you more about the date of his going to the Home than I can and that we lived together as husband and wife from Billups came out of the army until he went to the Home. He also knows that my husband visited me after he went to the Home. The winter before he died my husband left the Home on his liberty pass and came to see me and the weather was cold and snow fell and the asthma from which he suffered became worse and he got money from me to pay his way back to the Home. This was within six months of his death.
Q.  Describe your late husband.
A.  He was about 5 ft 5 or 6 inches tall, dark complexion, black hair & eyes, and was about 48 years old when he died in May 1890. He was a year or two older than I. … I had 10 children by said soldier, all of whom are dead except my daughter Mary E. Williams.”

 

Deposition, Caleb Garrison, 16 January 1895
61 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 22 Lodge st., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant Catharine Billups since July 1867. I have known her well and have associated with her intimately since said date. In July 1867 her husband Henry Billups rented a part of the house No. 11 Allentown Lane, Norfolk in which I lived and which I controlled and they lived — I mean this clt and her said husband Henry Billups — lived in said house with me until 1871 when they moved into another house. During the time said parties lived in my house Henry Billups, the husband, paid the rent and provided for the clt and their children as a father and husband should do and he recognized this claimant as his wife and she was so recognized by all who knew them. After leaving my house in 1871 we visited back and forth as long as Henry Billups was in the city, and since he left the city to go to the Hampton Soldiers Home. The clt and my family have been on terms of intimacy.”

 

Deposition, Mary E. Williams, 16 January 1895
24 years old; occupation, laundress; residence and post-office address, 22 Salter st., Norfolk, Va.
“I am a daughter of the claimant … I lived with my parents up to the time my said father went to the Soldiers Home near Hampton, Va. and I continued to live with my mother, the claimant, until I was married three years ago, and then my mother lived with me several years after I married. My parents, the clt and Henry Billups, the soldier, lived together as husband and wife, and were so recognized by all who knew them, from my earliest recollection until my father became unable to work when he entered the Hampton Soldiers Home, and after his entrance to said Home, he visited my mother, the clt, and I at intervals until a short time before his death, and I visited him at the Home on several occasions, therefore I know from personal knowledge that the soldier Henry Billups who died at the Soldiers Home in May 1890 was the husband of my mother, this claimant. I have seen the certificate of discharge from service of my father, the said Henry Billups and I remember that he served in the 1st USCC, Co G. I have also heard him say that he served in said company and regiment.”

 

Deposition, Mary Wallace, 16 January 1895
53 years old; occupation, laundress; residence and post-office address, 17 Chapel Lane, Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant Catharine Billups for the past 30 years and for the past 20 years she has been in my employ at intervals every year as a laundress, therefore I have known her well, in fact, we are cousins.
“I also knew her late husband Henry Billups from the time of his return from the army in the spring of 1866 until he died ….”

 

Deposition, Phillip Bagnall, 19 January 1895
51 years old; occupation, laborer; post-office address, 279 Cumberland st., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant Catharine Billups since in 1866 — the spring of 1866. I also knew her late husband Henry Billups who served with me in Co. G 1st USCC during the late war. I was a Sergeant in said company. I knew said soldier for nearly twenty years before we enlisted. He was born and reared in Matthews [sic] Co., Va. but was brought to Norfolk when a boy and was hired out in Norfolk where he and I worked together at carting brick. I knew from what the said Henry Billups told me that he had married this claimant but I do not remember to have seen her until he and I enlisted and were in camp near Norfolk & Fort Monroe, Va. when she used to visit him in our camp and on such occasions he recognized her as his wife and treated her as such. I did not however become acquainted with her until the said soldier and I were discharged from service and returned to Norfolk then the soldier Henry Billups and this claimant went to housekeeping and I visited them quite often. … I visited him several times [at the Soldiers Home]. …”

 

Deposition, W.P. Sands, 30 January 1895
52 years old; occupation, Adjutant Southern Branch National Military Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers near Hampton, Va.; post-office address, as above
“I am the custodian of the records of the Home above named. In the matter of Henry Billups the following appears on record viz:
Henry Billups, age 47. height 5 ft 6 in. complexion, dark. a resident of Norfolk in the state of Virginia. born in Matthews [sic] Co., Va. in service of the U.S. once viz: Enlisted Nov 1863 at Norfolk, Va. in Co. “G” 1st US Col Cav. Discharged at Brazos Santiago, Texas, Feby 4th 1866. Condition, married or single, not stated. Died in hospital 25th May 1890. Admitted to Home March 4th 1884.”

 

Deposition, John Binford, 31 January 1895
57 years old; occupation, laborer; post-office address, 7 Byrd st., Norfolk, Va.
“Q. Can you read and write?
A.  No, sir, neither.
Q. Do you know one Catharine Billups widow of Henry Billups late of Co. G, 1st USC Cavy?
A. No, sir, I do not.
Q. Do you know one Henry Harrison who appears to have lived at No. 82 Henry st. this city?
A.  No, sir.
Q.  Where did you reside in May 1892?
A.  I lived at 31 Scott st., this city.
Q.  Have you ever signed and executed any papers for use in the pension case of Catharine Billups?
A.  I have not.
Q.  Were you in and about the temporary office in Church st this city in May 1892 of Mrs. Belva A. Lockwood?
A.  I have been at her office at that place two or three times. I have been there when R. Bagnall, N.P. was there. I went there to be a witness for a Mrs. Pines and that is the only case in which I testified at Mrs. Lockwood’s office. I have heard you read the application for pension of Catharine Billups dated and executed before R. Bagnall, Jr. N.P. May 11th 1892, in which my name appears as if written by myself as an attesting witness to the signature by mark of the applicant Catharine Billups, and as witness to her identity to said application and I pronounce both of said signatures to be and they are forgeries. I did not sign and swear to that application nor did I authorize Mrs. B.A. Lockwood or any other person to write or sign my name thereto.”

 

Deposition, Catharine Billups, 1 February 1895 
49 years old; occupation, laundress; residence and post-office address, 141 St. Paul st., Norfolk, Va.
“Q. Who prepared your application for pension under the old general laws?
A. Mrs. B.A. Lockwood of Washington, DC fixed it up for me when she was in Norfolk something more than two years ago. She wrote out said application at her office on Church st near Queen in this city. but I don’t remember the day, month, or year when it was done
Q. Did you sign said application by mark or otherwise?
A. Yes, sir. I was in Mrs. Lockwood‘s office at the time and she called my attention to it. That is, that I had put in for pension under the new law and that I could get more money under the old law so we were told to go to her for same purpose in connection with my claim for pension and when I went to her office she asked me to sign my name to an application for pension under the old law.”

 

Deposition, Henry Harrison, 2 February 1895
about 39 years old; occupation, porter; residence and post-office address, 110 St. Paul st., Norfolk, Va.
“Q. Do you know John Binford who resided until recently at No.31Scott st, this city,
A. No, sir. ….
“Q. Do you know R. Bagnall, Jr. NP?
A. I am not personally acquainted with him and have never been in his office. He has recently been pointed out to me but I have never spoken to him.”

 

Deposition, Robert Bagnall, Jr., 10 April 1895
38 years old; occupation, student; residence and post-office address, Howard University
“I was the notary in the case of Catharine Billups. Belva Lockwood was the attorney. I think the two witnesses whose names appear as attesting and identifying Henry Harrison and John Binford. I was personally acquainted with Henry Harrison, wrote his own name for I saw him write it. I think he was living on Henry St. not positive I know he is at present living on East North st, Huntersville, Norfolk, Va. I think the number 66. I built the house he is living in. I was the Secretary of the Association that built it and superintended the construction. Harrison is short and stout about 5 ft 3, bacon color, also known by the name Henry Jones. He served in the army under the name Henry Harrison. I think he was in Co. B, 36 USCT, I also knew John Binford. He was a soldier. Can’t give service. He was a pensioner and was dropped & he was employed. I think by Mrs. Lockwood as a runner. He was very obnoxious in his manner. No, sir, he could not write. Mrs. Lockwood wrote his name in both cases. I asked her as to the legality of an attesting witness signing by mark. She told me that it was alright so it was done in my presence as the notary Burford was present and said Catharine makes her mark but as he could not write I questioned it. Mrs. Lockwood being an old and experienced pension attorney I yielded thinking I may have been in error. I know that both of these men have been witnesses in several cases and Mrs. Lockwood always wrote his name. I know both of them claimed that they knew the claimant before I swore them. I have no doubt but what Burford has an idea that if he can thread the case in court he would be employed at $1.50 per day as witness he has done this before and several others. Binford is a name that is considered among the lowest and most unreliable of his race, Henry Harrison is a honest laboring man and general reputation good. I am not surprised that Burford says now he did not know said claimant that is the character of the man I was not interested.”

 

Deposition, Belva A. Lockwood, 12 April 1895
60 years old; occupation, attorney; residence and post-office address, 619 F st, N.W., Washington, DC,
“I recall John Binford but not Henry Harrison. I wish to say with reference to it that the declaration is in my own handwriting as indicated was made up by me as indicated in my own office in Norfolk, Va. with the claimant before me and perhaps a dozen other witnesses of none of whom could write except Henry Harrison. John Binford was present. Said Catharine Billups marked her x mark and I wrote his name opposite as witness to the cross mark X of Catharine Billups in presence of notary but in the hurry seems to have neglected to make the cross mark X to his own signature. Which I have duly made of the opposite side. In that locality which is almost entirely colored there is only about two persons in one hundred able to write their names and I found it very difficult to do business at all as the name is boldly written in my own hand without any attempt dissimulation [?]. It is evident that it is not an attempt at forgery but a clerical error; When the fee agreements were signed later in the day I secured two white witnesses. The requirement of the blank calling for two witnesses who can write their names is not I understand a requirement of law nor even an unusual custom but simply a construction of claim agents to their clients to prevent unauthorized papers.

“I also get persons who can write for witnesses to cross mark X when I can but sometimes at places outside of Washington it’s almost impossible. I recollect having some talk with Notary R. Bagnall, Jr. about these signatures and the difficulty in finding persons who could write to identify claimants. I do not believe that either of one of those persons whose signatures appear upon the declaration would deny anything if brought face to face with me. I am the attorney. My statement has been real and is correctly recorded. If they deny it is from undue pressure.”

 

Deposition, Henry Harrison Jones, 26 April 1895
51 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 34 East North st., Norfolk, Va., Huntersville mail.

Q. Were you in the army in the late war?
A.  Yes, sir, I was in Co. C., 37th USCT
Q. By what name were you enrolled in said company?
A.  I was enrolled under the name Henry Harrison. I am pensioned under that name by Ctf 668,604.
Q. Do you know John Binford of Norfolk and formerly of the 36th USCT?
A.  Yes. …
“Q. Have you ever signed and executed any pension papers with the said Jno. Binford?
A.  Yes, sir. In May 1895 when Mrs. Lockwood had her office on  Church st near Queen in Norfolk. …”

 

Deposition, Catharine Billups, 19 June 1895
49 years old; occupation, housekeeper; residence, 249 Cumberland st, Norfolk, Va.; post-office address, 22 Salter st. Norfolk, Va.
“Q. Where were you living when your said husband left the service in March 1866?
A. He was discharged from service at Brazos Santiago, Texas on the 4th day of February 1866 and the regiment was brought to City Point, Va. and were discharged then or about March 15, 1866 and I think it was on or about the 15th day of March 1866 that my husband reached Norfolk where I was living on Main st and I forget the number with Mrs. Jones. after my husband got back from the army in March 1866 we lived in a kitchen in the backyard of the premises occupied by Mrs. Jones.

“I suppose we lived there about six months after my husband’s return from the army and then we moved to a house in Allentown Cove st, in the city and we lived there six or seven years. I had smallpox while living there. From Allentown, we moved on Chapel st., near Holt st. and we lived there two or three years. After that we moved about from place to place and did not stay long at any place.

“Q. When your husband returned from the army at what did he become employed?
A.  He worked on the wharves about the city at unloading grain from vessels and at loading it on the piers. That was his regular work even after he came out of the army.

“Q. Who worked with him at loading & unloading grain?
A. I used to hear my husband speak of a man named Bush as one of his fellow workmen but I don’t remember his first name. Henry Pearce is another man that worked with him. Pearce living on Bute st near the Old Baptist Church. These are all I remember.

“Q. What was your husband’s physical condition on his return from the army in March 1866?
A. He was in good health so far as I could see and I heard no complaint from him for all of ten years after leaving the service and then he began to have a hacking cough and complained of pain or a misery in his breast and he kept getting worse & worse until he finally gave up and went to the Soldiers Home, Va.

“I do not remember where we were living when my husband first began to cough but I knew it was some two or three years after we moved from Allentown. Yes, sir, my husband had varioloid and these some time thereafter he began to have a cough. After recovering from varioloid he took down with chills and fever then the cough and misery in his breast set in and he kept going down rapidly until he had to go to the Soldiers Home for treatment and he died there from disease of his lungs. The Dr. at the Home called it consumption.

“I was all right during the further investigation of my claim. I understand the questions asked me and my answers thereto have been correctly repeated here.”

 

Deposition, Phillip Bagnall, 20 June 1895 
51 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 279 Cumberland st., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant Catharine Billups since about the beginning of the late war. I just know her as the wife of Henry Billups. They were living together as husband and wife when I became acquainted with her but I had known the said Henry Billups for several years prior to the marriage. He was formerly from Matthews [sic] Co., Va.”

 

Deposition, John Boush, 19 June 1895 
53 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 42 Howard st., Norfolk, Va.
“I do not know the claimant … but I knew a Henry Billups with whom I served in Co “G” 1st USCC during the late war. I became acquainted with him in service. I knew him also as an associate here in Norfolk from the date of our discharge from service until he went to the Soldiers Home near Hampton, Va. to live and I saw him once after he went there.
“Q. Did you know him to suffer from any disability?
A.  He worked at loading & unloading grain from the time he came out of the service until he got sick and had to go to the Soldiers Home. It was several years after his discharge from service before I knew anything to be the matter with him. He then took a severe cold which resulted in a bad cough. Some of the men who worked with him in hauling grain told him that the dust from the oats & corn which he was handling caused him to have that cough. Richard Grant (dead), Oscar Miller (dead) & Owen Sykes were his fellow workmen.”

 

General Affidavit, Frank Foster, 16 March 1898
post-office address, Norfolk Co., Va.
“that he and Henry Billups belonged to the same owner before the war and were raised together; that he was intimately acquainted with him; that he served in the 37th USCT; that Billups was discharged a short time before affiant and came back to Norfolk; that affiant came to Norfolk as soon as he was discharged; that Billups lived in Norfolk from discharge until short while before death; that he saw Billups often during that time; that when Billups was discharged from service he was suffering from what affiant believes to have been a.sthma; that symptoms of disease were shown by difficulty in breathing; that during his attacks of this disease he was compelled to quit work; that he suffered from this disease continually from his discharge to time of death; that at times he was completely disabled from performing manual labor on account of it so much that he was compelled to give up all work and become an inmate of the Soldiers Home where he died; that affiant often visited at Billups’ house and saw him laid up in bed from the effects of this disease; that Billups often told him that this disease came on him while in service and that he began to suffer from it before he was discharged; that he makes these statements from his intimate acquaintance with the soldier and with his physical condition; that he has no interest in this case.”

 

General Affidavit, Phillip Bagnall & Jasper Cornick, 19 May 1898 
[Bagnall] 2 North St. (Huntersville)
[Cornick] 62 Chapel St., extended
“that they served in the same company and regiment with Henry Billups; that they were well acquainted with said Billups; that they knew Billups before he enlisted … ”

 

General Affidavit, Phillip Bagnall & Willis Quickmore, 20 May 1898
[Bagnall] residence, 2 North St., Norfolk, Va.
[Quickmore] residence, 42 Fifth St., Norfolk, Va.
“that they were both well acquainted with Henry Billups and served with him in the same company and regiment; that they knew said Henry Billups before he was enlisted in the same service …”

 

General Affidavit, Willis Quickmore, 13 August 1898
66 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk County, Va. … “that he served in the same company as Henry Billups; that he also knew him intimately about seven years before Billups enlisted in the army … that affiant lived in Norfolk, Va. with said Billups from the time they were discharged until Billups went to the Soldiers Home; that during that time he visited at Billups’ house, worked with him, and saw him about three times a week …”

 

Deposition, Catharine Billups, 13 February 1901
about 55 years old; occupation, laundress, post-office address, 127 Liberty st., Norfolk, Va.
“I am the widow … I never knew him by any name other than Henry Billups, and I knew him long before the war. His owner’s name was Brooks. My owner’s name was Land and we were married by the consent of our owners here in Norfolk, Va. several days before the war and we lived together until he enlisted. We resided in Norfolk, Va.

“I never knew any of his relatives except a sister, Maria Smith, Liberty St., Norfolk, Va.
“I know he enlisted in the 1st Cav for I visited him in camp at Old Point and at Portsmouth. He enlisted in Norfolk, Va. and was discharged in Texas. I don’t know how long he served. I don’t know what he did with his discharge. He was paid some money soon after the war. I don’t know whether it was bounty or what it was. I don’t know when he was born. A man by the name of Bagnall and another by the name of Wilson served with him. He was not a pensioner. He died at the Hampton, Va. Home 10 or 11 years ago.
“He had been a resident of the Home 2 or 3 years. He and I lived together in Norfolk, Va from the time he came home from the army until he became a resident of the Hampton Home.

“I had two children by the soldier — Mary Williams and Cass Billups. Mary was married shortly after the soldier died. My son Cass has been away from town most of the time since the soldier died. My children were over 16 when the soldier died.
“I have supported myself by doing laundry work since the soldier died.
“I resided on Bank st., between Queen & Bute when soldier died and for a year afterward. Then on Liberty st for 2 or 3 years. Then in Queen st between St. Paul and Cumberland for two years and since then at 127 Liberty st.
“I have never kept any boarders or lodgers. I have never rented any of my rooms.
“I have lived with my daughter and with my cousin Mary Wallace, 100 James St., ever since soldier died.
“I have not married since the death of my said husband.
Lazarus Tate and Philip Bagnall were witnesses in my pension claim.
“I never had a former husband and my said husband never had a former wife. J.W. Morris, Washington, DC was my atty.
“A Wm. Gant, dead, did my writing for me and I paid to nim $10 for his service. ______ Warren, Bank st. executes my vouchers. I go to his office on the 4th and take two witnesses.
I have not been known by any names other than Catharine Billups since my said husband died.”

 

Letter from Catharine Billups [on letterhead of Hubard and Hubard, Attorneys-at-Law, 145 Bank Street, Norfolk, Virginia] to Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, DC, 25 September 1916
“… I am 72 years of age having been born 1844 at Princess Anne Co., Va. …  [residence] 423 Liberty St., Norfolk, Va.”

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It appears the soldier deserted as he had not “been seen since he entered service.” People vouching for his mother’s pension application included his brother whose first name was “Africa” and a female neighbor whose occupation was “spiritual doctor.” The family lived in Norfolk County, Virginia.

 

Mother – 426,872 / —–, Losady Reed

 

Declaration for Dependent Mother’s Pension, Losady Reed, 12 July 1890
80 years old; residence, Mt. Pleasant, Norfolk Co., Va. .. “[The soldier] has not been seen since he entered service.”

 

General Affidavit, John N. Hodges & Clarinda Cuffey, 12 January 1892 
[Hodges] 51 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.;
[Cuffey] 55 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va
“each of them are well acquainted with the claimant Mrs. Lasady Reed, mother of James Reed … also well acquainted with the soldier in his lifetime … they have been knowing [them] before the war of 1861 … and they further state that the soldier’s father died in the fall of 1862 in Norfolk Co., Va.”

 

Sworn Statement, Clarinda Cartwright, 12 July 1893
65 years old; occupation, spiritual doctor; residence, 143 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va.  … “That she has been well and intimately acquainted with the entire family of James Reid … and that Andrew Reid and Nancy Reid both of whom are now dead was [sic] brother and sister of the above named soldier and that Africa Reid is the only surviving member of the family and [Lasadia Reid]  died on the 1st day of January 1893 on Percy St. in Norfolk, Va. at the house of Africa Reid and that the said Africa Reid bore her funeral expenses and had her buried in Mt. Pleasant at a cemetery belonging to St. Thomas Church in Norfolk, Va. … has known the entire family for about fifty years and [illegible] at Lasadia Reid’s death she was present when she died and assisted in shrouding her but owing to the fact that the place of burial was so far distant and that together with the bad weather she could not attend the funeral.”

 

Sworn Statement, John N. Hodges, 12 July 1893
53 years old; residence, 38 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va.  … “That I have known the said Africa Reid and Nancy Reid for about ten years and which period of time Losidia Reid always recognized Africa Reid as being her son and that she always spoke of him in affectionate and loving terms and frequently expressed herself as saying that were it not for her son and her [illegible] she would not know what to do for the necessities of this life … she was buried at Mt. Pleasant, Norfolk Co., Va. in a cemetery belonging to St. Thomas Church of which church she was a member. He did not attend the funeral owing to the fact that stayed at Africa’s house and taken care of the children while Africa and his wife Mary Ann and the remainder of the family attended the funeral of their mother and relatives.”

 

Sworn Statement, Africa Reid, 15 July 1893
45 years old; residence, Percy st on Princess Anne Ave, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Percy St., Norfolk, Va. … “That he is the only brother of James Reid and that their names were as follows who was his brothers and sisters: Andrew Reid, Africa Reid, and his sister Nancy Reid, and that Andrew Reid died about Twenty Two or Three years ago at Mt. Pleasant, Norfolk Co., Va. and that Nancy Reid died in Princess Anne Co., Va. about the 7th day of June 1886. He further states that when his brother Andrew Reid died he was unmarried having no wife or children and that when his sister Nancy Reid died she was married and that she left surviving her seven head of children. He further declares that his mother whose name was Losadia Reid and that . .. his mother made application before one W.R. Drury of Norfolk, Va. and that from time to time she was called on from time to time by Mr. Drury to introduce evidence which she did … that his mother was entirely dependent on his brother James for support … and that since the death of his brother James his mother has been dependent upon him for support and that he has taken care of his mother during her last illness and defrayed the expenses of her burial.”

 

Sworn Statement, Africa Reid, 14 September 1893
46 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Percy Street, Norfolk, Va. that his mother whose name is Losada Reid was an applicant for pension on account of her son whose name was James Reid deceased… and that this claim was filed by W.R. Drury, attorney, at Norfolk, Va. and that during his mother’s lifetime she never received a pension and that his mother died on the 1st day of January 1893 and that he has sufficient reason to believe that the pension has been granted and that the same has been drawn by someone who has no right and title to the same and that he makes this declaration for the purpose of asking the Honorable Commissioner of Pensions to cause an investigation.”

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Two men with the same name served in this regiment — one served in Company G; the other in Company K. Both settled in Portsmouth when their service ended. The “Company K” soldier was born in Nansemond County, Virginia. He married Mary Frances Perry about 1864 in Newport News; he married Emma Jane Foreman in 1912 in Berkley.

 

Invalid — 654,491 / 1,064,491
Widow — 151,860 / —— , Emma J. Reddick
C — 2,530,723

 

General Affidavit, Stephen Reddick, 7 August 1890
55 years old; post-office address, Berkley, Va … “I am afflicted in the eyes & pain the back by being thrown from a horse on drill at Fortress Monroe, Va. in year 1864 March 1st”

 

Continuance Affidavit, Nelson Tynes, 13 November 1890
51 years old; post-office address, Berkley, Va. … “has been well and personally acquainted [with the claimant] since 1866 until the present, during which time affiant has lived within one mile of claimant and seen and conversed with him as often as 3 times per week … has observed that the claimant has been suffering from misery in the back & eyes and has frequently noticed the following symptoms of the same. That the pains of the back are so severe at times as to prevent him from all kinds of work and that he complains of great weakness of the eyes … these disabilities have disqualified the claimant for manual labor to the extent of one half”

 

Medical Affidavit, W.W. Coggin, M.D., 11 April 1893
has been practicing medicine for 32 years; post-office address, Norfolk, Va.
“I certify that I have treated Stephen Reddick for ten years … he is not able to perform manual labor more than one-fourth of his time.”

 

Claimant’s Affidavit, Stephen Reddick, 9 December 1899
“The reason I cannot furnish the evidence of the Surgeons of my residence and who treated me in service. I do not know their post-office address, or whether they were living or dead; their names were Drs. Manning & Gray.”

 

Questionnaire (Form 3-374), Stephen Reddick, 29 June 1903
[birthplace] Nansemond Co., Va.
[enlisted at] Norfolk, Va.
[residence before enlistment] Suffolk & Portsmouth, Va.
[occupation] laborer
[enslaved, former owners] Yes, Burr Reddick & Willis S. Reddick
[discharged] City Point, Va.
[residences after discharge] Portsmouth, Va. 1866; South Mills, 1867-1870; Berkley, 1870-1900.
[occupation] laborer
[present residence] 100 First St., Berkley, Va.

 

Questionnaire, Stephen Reddick, 29 June 1903
[married] wife dead, Mary Frances Reddick nee Perry 
[when, where, by whom] about 1864 at Newport News, Va., no license, no ceremony
[record] no
[previous marriage] no
[living children] no

 

Declaration for Pension, Stephen Reddick, 18 May 1912
73 years old; residence, Norfolk Co., Va. …. born 1828 at Nansemond County, Virginia

 

Marriage License, Stephen Reddick & Emma Jane Foreman, 15 October 1912
License issued in Norfolk County, Va. Marriage took place 17 October 1912. Husband was 65 years old; wife was 52 years old. Both were widowed. Husband was born in Nansemond Co., Va.; wife was born in Norfolk Co., Va. Both resided in Norfolk Co., Va. Husband’s parents were Stephen Miltier and Sophia Jones. Wife’s parents were March & Eliza Etheredge. Husband’s occupation was laborer. Officiated by Jesse Jones in Berkley.

 

Marriage Certificate, Stephen Reddick & Emma Foreman, 17 October 1912
“This certifies that Stephen Reddick and Emma Foreman were united by me in the Holy Bond of Matrimony at my home in Berkley Ward, Norfolk, Va. on the 17 day of October in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred and 12, Conformably with the Ordinance of God and the Laws of the State, In the presence of Mrs. Ophelia Jones, Witness [Mrs. Ophelia Jones], Rev. Jesse T. Jones, Pastor

 

Deposition, Stephen Reddick, 10 April 1913
84 years old; occupation, light work; residence, Campostella, near Berkley; post-office address, Berkley Station, Norfolk, Va.
“I don’t know where my discharge certificate is. I used to sign my vouchers in the office of Hubbard & Hubbard. I got my last two checks without signing my vouchers and had them cashed in Mr. Martin’s bank in Berkley. I signed them by “X” mark and the bank man witnessed it, don’t know their names.”

 

Questionnaire (3-380), Stephen Reddick, 15 September 1915
[birthdate/birthplace] Nancymon [sic] County, Va., date not known
[organization] Co. K, 1st USCC, J.L. Whiteman, Captain
[post-office at enlistement] Portsmouth, Va.
[wife’s name] Emma Jane Reddick; maiden name
[when, where, by whom] Oct 17, 1912 in Berkley by Rev. Jessie Jones
[official record] no, was married at the home of Rev. Jessie Jones
[previously married] Mary Francies Perry was the maiden name of my first wife. Was married in 1862, exact date is lost. She died in Berkley in 1895, day not known. No other marriage.
[present wife’s previous marriage] Alexander Foreman in the month of September 1885, exact day not known. He died Nov 29th 1907. He served in First US Colored Cavalry, Company E under Captain Emerson. First marriage to Solomon Brock in month of March 1877, day not known.
[living with wife] Yes, I am now living with my wife, no separation.
[names, dates of birth, all children, living or dead] William Bell Reddick, born 1877 in the month of March, exact date not known. He was my only child and he is dead.
My colonel was Jef Gorodd

 

Sworn Statement, Nettie Norfleet & Rebekah Mitchell, 15 May 1920
[Norfleet] 55 years old; residence, 44 St. James St., Norfolk, Va.
[Mitchell] about 56 years old; residence, 123 Henry St., South Norfolk, Va.
“That they knew Stephen Reddick 30 years and about the same she knew herself, respectively, as Stephen was married to her sister from her early recollection; that Mary Frances Reddick, the first wife died Octr 31st — 27 years ago last October, that she Nettie Norfleet was standing by her when Mary Frances Reddick died and that she Rebekah Mitchell saw her shortly after her sister Mary Frances Reddick died that Stephen Reddick never married again until he married Emma Foreman about and that Emma Reddick has not married since the death of Stephen Reddick.”

 

General Affidavit, Irene Reed & Sam Clanton, 17 August 1920
[Reed] 36 years old; residence, Campostella, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Clanton] 45 years old; residence, 713 Cray St., Norfolk, Va.
“That they are well and personally acquainted with the claimant, Emma Jane Reddick, they also knew the soldier, Stephen Reddick, they know that they were married in 1912, and from seeing them frequently after their marriage they know that they lived together as husband and wife without separation or divorce from the date of their marriage and as long as they lived in Berkeley, Virginia. They moved from Berkeley, Virginia to Saint Brides, Virginia in the year (September) 1918.”

 

General Affidavit, A.M. Burfoot, 19 August 1920
35 years old; residence, Fentress, Norfolk Co., Va. … “He is the physician who attended the soldier, Stephen Reddick, in his last illness and known that he died on the 12. day of January 1920 as shown by his records.”

 

General Affidavit, J. Polk Randolph & Grant Brown, 21 August 1920
[Randolph] 63 years old; residence, Saint Brides Parish, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Brown] 44 years old; residence, Saint Brides Parish, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That they are all well and personally acquainted with the claimant, Emma J. Reddick, they also knew the soldier, Stephen Reddick; they saw them frequently after they came to St. Brides, Va. about the year 1918 and know that they live together as husband and wife, without separation or divorce from the mentioned date and until the soldier died in the year 1920.”

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Two men with the same name served in this regiment — one in Company G, the other in Company K. Both settled in Portsmouth when their service ended. The “Company G” soldier grew up in Southampton County, Virginia. He married Mary Jane Reddick “before the war and by consent of owners.”  Several witnesses had known him since childhood. The soldier was injured when thrown from his horse but returned to duty as the company cook.

 

Widow — 545,530 / —–, Mary Jane Reddick

 

Widow’s Claim for Pension, Charles Eason & James Wilkins, 23 April 1892
[Eason] 40 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Va.
[Wilkins] 40 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Va.
“Said Mary Jane Reddick is without other means of support than her daily labor; that the marriage of the soldier to her cannot be proved by recorded evidence because they were married before the war and by consent of owners. no license as is the case now required. That they lived together as man & wife and were recognized in the community in which they lived and that he died on the 24th day of April 1890 with what was supposed to be rheumatism the result of an injury received in the right hip by being thrown from his horse. Their means of knowledge of the foregoing is derived from being in the same brigade with the said Stephen Reddick.”

 

General Affidavit, Charles Williams, 14 December 1892
74 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va. …. “I was acquainted with Stephen Reddick long before he went into the United States service and afterward. He belonged to the same regiment with me – Co G. 1st US Colored Cavalry. I was near neighbor to him when he came home from the war and I continued to see him daily until he died April 24th 1880.”

 

Application to Determine Correct Service, Mary J. Reddick, 30 December 1892
“[Stephen Reddick] served in the state of Virginia before Richmond and Petersburg, Va. and relieved from duty on the account of being disabled by being thrown from his horse while on duty. This was the 10th day of June 1863 and thus he was returned to the company as the cook for the same …

“That names of the officers of his company were as follows, viz.:
Captain Colding
Sergeant William Teamor
Corporals Joseph Cornick
[illegible] David Ortly, Isaac Smith, George Rickers, Dempsey Copeland ….
Stephen Reddick … lost his discharge papers by being burned in his house by fire together with the house.

“Also at the same time and place, personally appeared before me Charles Wilkins and Albert Jones of Norfolk County, State of Virginia to me well-known as credible persons who being sworn according to law declare that they have been for 35  and 30 years respectively acquainted with the above-named applicant.
“I was in the same regiment with Stephen Reddick.
Albert Jones and Charles Williams”

 

General Affidavit, Charles Eason & Albert Jones, 29 June 1893
[Eason] 75 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Jones] 51 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That we were well acquainted with Stephen Reddick and know that the said Reddick was a member of Company G, 1st USCol Cav. We were in the same regiment. Knew him in the service and at the time of discharge and that we believe his discharge certificate was burned up with his other contents on the West Branch Dist. of Norfolk County. Our knowledge of the above facts are derived from being in the same Regiment with him. He enlisted on or before us on the 15th day of January 186[?] and discharged in 1866. And that the said Stephen Reddick was not in the military or naval service of the U.S. since his discharge in 1866.”

 

Affidavit of Claimant, Mary J. Reddick, 23 August 1893
post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Va. “She was born in Southampton County., Va. — post office Jerusalem — knew him at least 12 years before we were married, was married by consent of owner as was custom with all slaves … had 17 children by our marriage but there were none under 16 years of age at the time of his death. That my husband was born in Nansemond Co., Va. He claimed his age 70 years when he died. His height about 5 feet 8 inches, bacon color, name of his owner Abram Reddick and that he never had any other wife.”

 

General Affidavit, Narcissa Parker & Mary Westmoreland, 6 September 1893
[Parker] 50 years old; post-office address
[Westmoreland] 44 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
[The form’s intended for one statement but two individuals were noted on the form. The post-office address follows the second person’s name  which suggests but doesn’t prove that the affiants had the same post-office address — Leslie]

“We the undersigned hereby certify that we are well and intimately acquainted with the claimant and have known her from the date of her husband’s death. Stephen Reddick which occurred April 24th 1890 to the present time that she has not remarried and we believe that she has never lived with any other man as his wife since the death of her late husband.”

 

General Affidavit, Mary Jane Riddick, 5 February 1894
55 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.  “That there is no ‘plantation records’ of her marriage to Stephen Reddick. That her former owner Ned Rawles is dead and can’t be reached.”

 

General Affidavit, Narcissa Daughtry & Rona Eley, 5 February 1894
[Daughtrey] 50 years old;
[Eley] 47 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
[The form’s intended for one statement but two individuals were noted on the form. The post-office address follows the second person’s name  which suggests but doesn’t prove that the affiants had the same post-office address — Leslie]

“That they are and were well acquainted with Mary Jane Reddick and Stephen Reddick the husband of the claimant. That Mary Jane Reddick was a slave and was owned by one Ned Rawles of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. That affiants were also owned by the said Ned Rawles of the said county. That affiants have been acquainted with Mary Jane Reddick all of their lives. That the said Stephen Reddick married the said Mary Jane Reddick according to the custom of slaves before the war and lived with the said Mary Jane Reddick as husband and wife up to the time of his (the said Stephen Reddick’s) enlistment in service of the United States and were recognized and considered man and wife in the community in which they resided.  … That affiants’ means of having these facts are due to their time in the immediate vicinity with claimant.”

 

General Affidavit, Ann R. Bennett & Lavinia J. Drewry, 20 February 1894
[Bennett] 45 years old; post-office address, 613 Griffin St., Portsmouth, Norfolk Co.,   Va.
[Drewry] 62 years old; post-office address, 613 Griffin St., Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That they were well acquainted with the claimant Mary Jane Reddick and her husband the soldier from about the time he came from the war till the time of his death, nearly four years ago, having been a neighbor from the time of first acquaintance till the time of soldier’s death.”

 

Sworn Statement, Lavinia Drewry, 21 July 1897
66 years old; post-office address, 818 Griffin St., Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.  “That she was personally well acquainted with Stephen Reddick, husband of the claimant from the time of his return from the army in 1865 to the time of his death.”

 

Sworn Statement, Narcissa Daughtry, 18 January 1899
about 58 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.  “That she was well acquainted with Stephen Reddick the husband of the claimant Mary Jane Reddick having known him in his boyhood in Southampton Co., Va. where he said Stephen Redick was brought up and lived till the beginning of the war of the rebellion.”

 

General Affidavit, Narcissa Parker & Mary Westmoreland, 6 September 1893
[Parker] 50 years old; post-office address
[Westmoreland] 44 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
[The form’s intended for one statement but two individuals were noted on the form. The post-office address follows the second person’s name  which suggests but doesn’t prove that the affiants had the same post-office address — Leslie]

“We the undersigned hereby certify that we are well and intimately acquainted with the claimant and have known her from the date of her husband’s death. Stephen Reddick which occurred April 24th 1890 to the present time that she has not remarried and we believe that she has never lived with any other man as his wife since the death of her late husband.”

 

General Affidavit, Mary Jane Riddick, 5 February 1894
55 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.  “That there is no ‘plantation records’ of her marriage to Stephen Reddick. That her former owner Ned Rawles is dead and can’t be reached.”

 

General Affidavit, Narcissa Daughtry & Rona Eley, 5 February 1894
[Daughtrey] 50 years old;
[Eley] 47 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
[The form’s intended for one statement but two individuals were noted on the form. The post-office address follows the second person’s name  which suggests but doesn’t prove that the affiants had the same post-office address — Leslie]

“That they are and were well acquainted with Mary Jane Reddick and Stephen Reddick the husband of the claimant. That Mary Jane Reddick was a slave and was owned by one Ned Rawles of Isle of Wight County, Virginia. That affiants were also owned by the said Ned Rawles of the said county. That affiants have been acquainted with Mary Jane Reddick all of their lives. That the said Stephen Reddick married the said Mary Jane Reddick according to the custom of slaves before the war and lived with the said Mary Jane Reddick as husband and wife up to the time of his (the said Stephen Reddick’s) enlistment in service of the United States and were recognized and considered man and wife in the community in which they resided.  … That affiants’ means of having these facts are due to their time in the immediate vicinity with claimant.”

 

General Affidavit, Ann R. Bennett & Lavinia J. Drewry, 20 February 1894
[Bennett] 45 years old; post-office address, 613 Griffin St., Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
[Drewry] 62 years old; post-office address, 613 Griffin St., Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That they were well acquainted with the claimant Mary Jane Reddick and her husband the soldier from about the time he came from the war till the time of his death, nearly four years ago, having been a neighbor from the time of first acquaintance till the time of soldier’s death.”

 

Sworn Statement, Lavinia Drewry, 21 July 1897
66 years old; post-office address, 818 Griffin St., Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.  “That she was personally well acquainted with Stephen Reddick, husband of the claimant from the time of his return from the army in 1865 to the time of his death.”

 

Sworn Statement, Narcissa Daughtry, 18 January 1899
about 58 years old; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.  “That she was well acquainted with Stephen Reddick the husband of the claimant Mary Jane Reddick having known him in his boyhood in Southampton Co., Va. where he said Stephen Redick was brought up and lived till the beginning of the war of the rebellion.”

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