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Posts Tagged ‘CMSR’

This sidebar accompanies today’s sketch for Charles Sprout, Company E, 1st US Colored Cavalry.
Thank you, Mr. Wilinski for sharing this information with me — Leslie

Charles Sprout: A Civil War Soldier Revisited
“An exploration of the life and death of Charles Sprout, a soldier in the United States Colored Troops (USCT) during and after the Civil War. Using military and pension records held by the National Archives, it shows how the National Archives supports and provides synergy with other federal agencies, such as the National Park Service, in presenting an enslaved person’s unique military history.”

This brief documentary on YouTube gives a lot of detail about Charles Sprout’s life before and after the Civil War. Research was conducted by Jesse Wilinski, Archives Technician, National Archives, Washington, DC who also volunteers at the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, Virginia. Also featured in the film is Peter Maugle, Park Ranger/Historian, Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, Virginia.

Approved Pension File for Private Charles Sprout, Company E, 1st U.S. Colored Troops Cavalry Regiment (SC-814459)

Compiled Military Service Record for Private Charles Sprout
A serviceman’s CMSR includes a physicial description, details about his enlistment, his whereabouts during his service, notes about sums owned to a sutler or the U.S. Army, and legal status at enlistment.

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Compiled Military Service Records

This is the bottom portion of one of the cards in the Compiled Military Service Record for William Hill, Company H, 1st U.S. Colored Cavalry.

“Beginning in the 1890s, the War Department created the Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) to document the military service of Volunteer soldiers. Transcribed from original muster and pay rolls, regimental returns, descriptive books, hospital rolls, and other records, the CMSRs were intended to permit more rapid and efficient checking of military and medical records in connection with claims for pensions and other veterans’ benefits.


“The War Department initially created CMSRs for Union veterans of the Civil War and later expanded the records to include state Volunteers from other conflicts. As a result, the National Archives now holds CMSRs for Volunteer soldiers from the Revolutionary War through the Philippine Insurrection.”


For the complete article on the National Archives’ website, click on this waypoint:
Home>Research Our Records>Military Records Research>Army Records at the National Archives>Compiled Military Service Records.

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Dennis Banks, Company K

When this soldier died in service, he was in debt to the U.S. Army (15 cents for ordnance plus $1.64 for camp and garrison equipage) and he owed $14.00 to a sutler.
— Compiled military service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served with the United States Colored Troops [microform]: 1st through 5th United States Colored Cavalry, 5th Massachusetts Cavalry (Colored), 6th United States Colored Cavalry (1997). Reel 0001 – 1st United States Colored Cavalry: Ackess, Alexander – Bom, John H. at https://archive.org/details/compiledmili0001akesunit/page/n5 ). Banks’s Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) can be viewed at n863-n880

Widow — 141,638 / 108,524, Caroline Banks

Caroline Banks, Widow’s Claim for Pension, 26 January 1867
25 years old; post-office address, Norfolk, Virginia
“was married to said Dennis Banks on or about the 24 Dec 1860, near Elizabeth City in the county of Pasquotank, and State of North Carolina by mutual consent ….married by consent of master John Banks to Dennis Banks by consent of his master John Banks … Dennis Banks [died at] Brazos Santiago, in the State of Texas, on or about the 5 day of July, 1865, of cholera … at the time of his death, one child born in wedlock since dead”
“Also personally appeared before me, Dempsey Elliott, and Raphael Wright, residents of Norfolk County, and State of Virginia”

Sworn Statement, Caroline Banks, 29 January 1869
“her maiden name was Caroline Banks. That she was married in the mode common among persons of color in the state of North Carolina at that time, without a license or the service of a minister of the gospel, but by mutual consent and by cohabitation of the parties”
“At the same time, personally appeared Henry Banks and Manuel Banks … that they are well acquainted with Caroline Banks … have known her for twenty years. That they were also well acquainted with her husband Dennis Banks … the said parties and the affiant living near neighbors of each other in the county of Pasquotank, NC all their lives … were present when [the couple] married, in the mode common among persons of color in North Carolina”

Marriage License [copy], Edward Clarke and Mrs. Caroline Banks, 30 December 1871
Norfolk County; Husband, 26 years old and single. Wife, 25 years old and widowed. Both lived in Norfolk County, Virginia. He was born in Norfolk County, Virginia to “Jas. and Lottie Clark.” and worked as an oysterman. She was born in Edenton, North Carolina and her parents weren’t named. They were married by Reuben Jones at Churchland, Norfolk County, Virginia.

Widow’s Claim for Arrears Pension, Caroline Banks, 20 March 1883
39 years old; residence, Portsmouth, Virginia; post-office address, Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Virginia
“she is the widow of Dennis Banks who was a Corporal of Company K commanded by Captain Whitehead of the 1st Regiment of the U.S.C. Cavalry Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Jeffey Geard and who died in U.S. Service at Brazos Santiago Texas … September 1865″
“That she was married to the said Dennis Banks on December 1856 at Perquinky [sp?], NC by consent of their former owners; that her name before her said marriage was Carline Banks … appoints William Ward, 276 1/2 Queen St. of Norfolk, Va., her attorney”
“On the same day personally came Charles Easn a resident of Western Branch township, Va. and Benjamn Jenkins a resident of Western Branch township, Va. … they have been personally acquainted with the soldier and his wife 30 years or more.”
“[signed by] Chas. Eason … Ben Jenkins

Note: Spelling variants — “Dennis,” “Denous,” “Denis,” and “Dempsey” — appeared in the Compiled Military Service Record — Leslie

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According to Samuel Washington’s Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) he was born free in Gloucester, Virginia. Washington worked as a farmer before enlisting at Yorktown. He entered as a Private and mustered out as a Sergeant. 
— Compiled military service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served with the United States Colored Troops [microform]: 1st through 5th United States Colored Cavalry, 5th Massachusetts Cavalry (Colored), 6th United States Colored Cavalry (1997). Reel 0014 – 1st United States Colored Cavalry: Tines, Archer – Wheldon, Charles M. (online at  https://archive.org/details/compiledmili0014akesunit/  ).

Invalid — 447,976 / 670,226

Sworn Statement, Donald Hudgins and Jackson Toliver, 17 February 1883
“[They have known the claimant] from boyhood and worked with him in farming etc long before the Rebellion of 1861 …”

General Affidavit, William B. Gransby, 18 February 1883
38 years old; residence, Williamsburg, James City Co., Va.
“… and while in Texas I knew he was in the hospital.”

General Affidavit, Dr. William H. Shield, 2 November 1889
“[He knew the claimant], he attended him professionally for fracture of the frontal bone over the left sinus caused as he reported by gunshot would received in battle….”

Deposition, Moses Carter, 26 May 1890
51 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, Yorktown, York County, Virginia
“I have known the claimant since in 1862. We worked together, he in Co K 1st USCC and I in Co B 2d USCC. Our Regts. were together during all of our service and I saw saw clmt almost daily and was frequently on duty with him. I remember distinctly of visiting him in his quarters at Newport News, Va.  some time in the summer of 1864. I heard that he had been wounded while on an expedition to Smithfield, Va. …”

Deposition, Phelan Washington, 26 May 1890
56 years old; occupation, farmer; post-office address, c/o Lee Hall, Warwick Co., Va.
“I became acquainted with the claimant … in Feby 1864 at the date of my enlistment … and I have known him well ever since. We are not related.”

Deposition, William Gransby, 26 May 1890
46 years old; occupation, driver at Eastern Lunatic Asylum; post-office address, Williamsburg, James City Co., Va.
“I served as Q[uarter] M[aster] Sergeant of Co. K … During the summer of 1864 we were bunkmates and I well remember of his going from our camp at Newport News in July or August 1864 with a detail of me under command of Captain Whiteman to Springfield, Va.”
Note: Eastern Lunatic Asylum now known as Eastern State Hospital, Williamsburg, Virginia was founded in 1773. A psychiatric hospital for African Americans, Central Lunatic Asylum for Colored Insane now known as Central State Hospital, Petersburg, Virginia was founded in 1869 — Leslie

Deposition, Samuel B. Humphries, 2 June 1890
49 years old; occupation, driver, residence and post-office address, 46 Moseley St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I served during the late war … but I do not recall the claimant as having belonged to said co. No, sir, I do not remember him but I do remember the expedition to Smithfield, Va. of which he makes mention …”

Deposition, Stephen Riddick, 2 June 1890
about fifty-five years old; occupation, laborer; address and post-office address, Berkley, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I served during the late war … and I remember Samuel Washington the claimant but my recollection of him is not clear.”

Questionnaire (Form 3-402), Samuel Washington, 4 June 1898
[married] yes
[when, where, by whom] Dec 1864
[record?] none
[previously married] no
[living children] two; Sambo and Willie, five years old and four years old, not by my first wife

General Affidavit, Samuel Humphries, 13 January 1890
“I am unable furnish the affidavit of my Regimental Surgeon Dr. Wm. H. Gray because he is dead.
“I am also unable to furnish further medical evidence besides that of Dr. Wm. H. Shield because he is the only one who has treated me since discharge for my wound of head.”

General Affidavit, Samuel Humphries, 18 February 1899
[residence] Tampico, York Co., Va.
[residence since discharge] “I have lived in this neighborhood since Feby 4th 1866
[nearest post-office address] Yorktown since Tampico was opened
[occupation] oysterman and farmer
[known by any other name] no
[previous service] none

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The soldier was born in Norfolk, Virginia, enlisted in that city in December 1863, and died of cerebo-spinal meningitis in Portsmouth, Virginia on January 31, 1865. He was buried at Hampton National Cemetery.

— Compiled military service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served with the United States Colored Troops [microform]: 1st through 5th United States Colored Cavalry, 5th Massachusetts Cavalry (Colored), 6th United States Colored Cavalry (1997). Reel 0014 – 1st United States Colored Cavalry: Tines, Archer – Wheldon, Charles M. (online at  https://archive.org/details/compiledmili0014akesunit/mode/2up). Anderson Toyan’s CMSR can viewed at (n112 – n116).

 

Mother — 454,805 / 463,669, Lucinda Toyan

 

Declaration for Mother’s Pension, Lucinda Loyan, 18 July 1890
60 years old; residence, Perquimans Co., North Carolina; post-office address, Belvidere, Perquimans Co., N.C.
“He left neither widow, child nor children, but a dependent mother — Lucinda Loyan who received his bounty under Certificate 289,351 on August 5, 1873 at Fort Monroe, Va.”

 

Claimant’s Affidavit, Lucinda Loyan alias Twine, 17 April 1896
“The claimant states that her correct name is Lucinda Twine & that her son’s name should be Anderson Twine. She states that she cannot read or write herself. [When she received Certificate 289,351 and her son’s bounty at Fort Monroe] and when her application for pension was wrote, she did give that certificate to the man who wrote it …. said that the man who enrolled her son must have made a mistake and put his name Loyan instead of Twine for the name on the certificate was Lucinda Loyan so he made out her application for pension by that name”

 

General Affidavit, Josephus Riddick, 18 July 1896
post-office address, Nicanor, Perquimans Co., N.C.
“I was not in the same company but I was in the same Reg’t and in Co E.
“We were raised near together and I knew him well.”

 

General Affidavit, Benjamin Hurdle, 13 April 1897
54 years old; post-office address, Belvidere, Perquimans Co., NC
“I was acquainted with Anderson Twine …”

 

General Affidavit, Dempsey Elliott, 26 May 1897
post-office address, Suffolk, Nansemond Co., Va.
“I was a Sergnt. in Company D, 1st Reg USCC  and I knew Anderson Twine who was a member of said company and Reg. I knew that he was sick and died in Portsmouth, Va. in the winter time of 1864.”

 

General Affidavit, Lucinda Twine, 12 June 1897
“To the Hon. Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, DC — Sir, I beg to state that I, Lucinda Twine, the above named claimant has from this day changed my post-office address from Belvidere, Perquimans, North Carolina to Dewight, Perqs Co., N.C. hoping if there should be any mail matter sent to me at any time from the department that it may be sent to that office & oblige your humble servant.”
[The scribe wrote “Dewight” but it’s “Dwight, Perquimans County, North Carolina” — Leslie]

 

General Affidavit, Acwell Jones, 22 March 1897
post-office address, 723 Blunt Street, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va.
“I was acquainted with Anderson Twine and was in the same Company and Regiment …. I waited upon him during the sickness that brought on his death. I was 3d duty sergeant at the time of his death … and saw his body after death and recognized it.”

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