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Posts Tagged ‘Spotlight’

The tribute published in A Documented History of the First Baptist Church, Bute Street, Norfolk, Virginia, 1800-1988 was nearly identical to the obituary which appeared in The Norfolk Journal and Guide. There were two significant differences:

The soldier London Hurdle was identified as “Deacon Lurdel Hurdle” in the church history.

The scripture in Reverend Richard H. Bowling’s sermon was expanded in the newspaper account beyond the single sentence from Judges which appeared in both texts — “And, behold there came a old man from his work out of the field at even.” Click on the soldier’s name to see the obituary.

What’s consistent in both publications is the mention of Hurdle’s membership in the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR). Though there were chapters in Virginia and North Carolina, the location of surviving documents from many GAR chapters across the country is unknown. Click the image above for a list of chapters in these neighboring states.


[Note: I recently viewed the church history which is in the possession of a relative — Leslie].

Note: Until the National Archives in Washington, DC re-opens to the public I will spotlight individuals whose sketches have been published  along with a new and interesting fact that wasn’t mentioned in the original post. Click on the individual’s name in this entry to view the original sketch.

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This soldier was an inmate at the National Soldiers Home, Hampton, Virginia. Each person’s ledger entry recorded information in four sections: Military History, Domestic History, Home History, and General Remarks. The details from Domestic History include contact information for Isaac Dean‘s “nearest relative” — who might not have been a relative at all.

Note: Until the National Archives in Washington, DC re-opens to the public I will spotlight individuals whose sketches have been published  along with a new and interesting fact that wasn’t mentioned in the original post. Click on the individual’s name in this entry to view the original sketch.

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Card records of headstones provided for deceased Union Civil war veterans, ca. 1879-ca. 1903 : NARA RG92 publication M1845.

This soldier’s buried in Norfolk’s West Point Cemetery, a municipal cemetery not a national cemetery, established in 1873. This card record gives basic information about William Teemer‘s military organization. These microfilmed card records are available in databases at Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org.

Note: Until the National Archives in Washington, DC re-opens to the public I will spotlight individuals whose sketches have been published  along with a new and interesting fact that wasn’t mentioned in the original post. Click on the individual’s name in this entry to view the original sketch.

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This soldier is one of many members of the 1st. U.S. Colored Cavalry buried at Hampton National Cemetery, Hampton, Virginia. Dawson Gordney died at his home in Portsmouth, January 8, 1907. Many burials at this cemetery are of those who had been inmates at the nearby National Soldiers Home in Hampton.

Note: Until the National Archives in Washington, DC re-opens to the public I will spotlight individuals whose sketches have been published  along with a new and interesting fact that wasn’t mentioned in the original post. Click on the individual’s name in this entry to view the original sketch.

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Spotlight: Virginius Jones, Company K

“Virginia, Freedmen’s Bureau Field Office Records, 1865-1872,” database with images, FamilySearch (Fort Monroe, assistant subassistant commissioner) > Roll 130, Registers of freedmen sent to New England states, 1866-1867 > image 1 of 31; citing NARA microfilm publication M1913 (College Park, Maryland: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

This soldier applied for his pension from Lynn, Massachusetts. How come? He was one of hundreds of people that the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (BRFAL) transported to places that had worker shortages. I was browsing when I found him. I repeated the usual search strategies e.g. truncating the character string, using spelling variants — and still haven’t found him that way. A hint to the wise: Searchable indexes aren’t foolproof. When you find something of interest, make a note because you might never find it again.

Note: At an evening campfire in Spring 1864 Jones’s pistol fired accidentally and shot my great-great-uncle William Thomas Pitt through the ankle.

Note: Until the National Archives in Washington, DC re-opens to the public I will spotlight individuals whose sketches have been published  along with a new and interesting fact that wasn’t mentioned in the original post. Click on the individual’s name in this entry to view the original sketch.

Read Full Post »

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