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The soldier reported that he experienced “internal injury of left side which was contracted at Camp Hamilton, Va. while engaged in a skirmish drill exercise by falling from the roof of a low shed or stable on the hilt of my sabre which stuck fast in the ground.”
Disability Affidavit, James Malburn, 3 February 1890

 

Invalid — 753,264 / 592,379

 

Disability Affidavit, James Malburn, 3 February 1890
63 years old; residence, Barbersville, Norfolk County, Va.; post-office address, c/o Rawlins Whitehurst & Co., Norfolk, Va. … For about 36 years immediately preceding my enlistment … I resided in the following-named places: Princess Anne Co., Va. … my occupation was that of a farmer … Since my discharge from said service on the 4th day of Feby , 1866, I have resided in Ferry Point, Princess Anne Co., Va. about 3 years; then at the the east end of Queen St., Norfolk, Va. about 1 1/2 years; then in Chappell St about 3 yrs; then out to Norfolk Co. about 1 year; then to Georgiatown [sp?] about 1 year, then to Princess Anne Ave. 1 year; then to Church St. then to Charles St.; then to Hull St.,; then to McLeans Lane: then to Barbersville where I now reside … and my occupation has been that of laborer …”

 

Proof of Disability, Frank Robinson, and Sandy Craig, 3 February 1890
[Robinson] 51 years old, residence, 387 Church St., Norfolk, Va
[Craig] 45 years old, residence, 247 Church St., Norfolk, Va.
“they are acquainted with James Malburn …”

 

Memo, W.T.. Shipp, Bookkeeper, 10 December 1890
“The firm of Rawlins Whitehurst & Co. has had Jas. Malbone in its employ for 10 years or more and found him always faithful to his duties and ever ready to do his work …”

 

Neighbors’ Affidavit, John Whitehurst and Wm. H. Reid, 16 January 1891
[Whitehurst] 67 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 100 Goff St., Norfolk, Va.
[Reid] 55 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 100 Goff St., Norfolk, Va.
“personally acquainted with James Malburn the claimant for 30 years, and 20 years, respectively … Whitehurst drives a team, has seen James Malburn nearly every day, he lives close neighbors within one hundred & fifty yards … Reid testifies that he is the presiding elder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church of Norfolk, Va., knows James Malburn well, is a personal friend, lives near enough to speak with him from his door, sees him at least daily …”

 

General Affidavit, Solomon Ahern and Nathaniel Simmons, 22 July 1895
[Ahern] 55 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 80 Smith St., Norfolk, Va.
[Simmons] residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 52 Howard St., Norfolk, Va.
“acquainted with the soldier upwards of 25 years, were born in the same county — since his discharge, we have resided in the same vicinity — have worked with him often …”

 

General Affidavit, John Whitehurst and Noah Lamb, 13 January 1897
[Whitehurst] 67 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 100 Goff St., Norfolk, Va.
[Lamb] 50 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 15 Brickhouse Ave., Huntersville Ward, Norfolk, Va.
“have known [claimant] since the date of discharge to the present seeing him frequently each month and year since date of discharge to the present and during all these years, many times each year we have heard him complain of an injury … cannot perform much manual labor…”

 

General Affidavit, Harry Farmer, 12 July 1897
55 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.; “that he served in the same company & regiment with claimant during the late war; was very intimate with him …”

 

General Affidavit, Johnson Farmer, 12 July 1897
60 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.; post-office address, 375 Bank St., Norfolk, Va.
“[T]hat he served in the same company & regiment … was very intimate with him …While we were in Santiago, Texas during the winter of 1865-66 our sleeping quarters being very damp owing to high tides rising under our bunkers, sometimes we would sit up in the water …”

 

Form 3-306, Harry Farmer, 29 November 1897
55 years old; residence and post-office address, 17 4th St., Norfolk, Va.
“[after his injury] our captain, Capt. Duboise took him and made him company cook, and he was our cook off and on all the time afterwards …”

 

Memo, Nathaniel Simmons, 29 November 1897
61 years old; residence and post-office address, 172 Nickerson St., Norfolk, Va.
“I have known the claimant … all my life but I was not in the army with him … He was out of service some months before I got back to Norfolk and was living in the country and I staid [sic] here in the city, and did not see much of claimant until he moved to this city about 27 years ago, and then he went to work with me at Rawlins & Nichols ice house and we worked there together for at least 20 years …”

 

Memo, Harry Farmer, 30 November 1897
55 years old; occupation, laborer; residence and post-office address, 17 Fourth St., Norfolk, Va. “served in the same company and regiment …”

 

Memo, John Whitehurst, 30 November 1897
72 years old; residence and post-office address, 100 Goff St., Norfolk, Va.
“I knew two or three [people by that name] … If you refer to the James Malburn who used to work for Rawlins & Nichols & Co. I knew him slightly during the late war, but do not know what service he was in during the war … I use to see him about Rawlins & Nichols ice house, probably once a fortnight for several years …”

 

Memo, Solomon Moore, 30 November 1897
58 years old; residence and post-office address, 116 Smith St., Norfolk, Va.
“[Claimant] was in Co C … and I was in Co I 36 USCT … got back home to Norfolk, Va. in November 1866, and clt was then living in the country, and I did not see or know much of him until in 1870 or 71, when he moved into Norfolk, Va. and began to work for Rawlins & Nichols, at bundling ice. I also worked for same firm …”

 

General Affidavit, James Malburn, 7 August 1897
69 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.
“unable to furnish the affidavits of any of his commissioned officers … he has never seen or heard of any of said officers since the war & does not know where they are …”

 

Questionnaire (Form 3-173), James Malburn, 4 December 1897
[wife] widower (Louvenia Malburn) (Louvenia Capps)
[when, where, by whom] had been married about 43 years; died about two years ago
[previous marriage] no
[living children] nine — all now over 16 years old

 

Questionnaire (Form 3-402), Jas. Malburn, 14 March 1898
[married] Wife died November 1895; Louvenia (Capps) Malburn
[when, where, by whom] about 1851
[record] married by consent of owners — no license
[previously married] no
[living children] eight — all over 21 years of age

 

Deposition, James Malburne, 9 January 1902
75 years old; retired farmer; residence, 27 Goff St., Norfolk, Va.
“I was born in Princess Anne Co., Va. and was a slave; was owned by Noah Murden. My father was Ralph Malburn. I took my name from him. I was called James Murden before the war but since the war I have always been called James Malburn.
“I was only in two states while I was a soldier. I was first in Va. and remained there till after Richmond fell and then we went to Texas. We went to Texas by water; we went on the Dudley Buck. We stopped on the way to Texas to coal the boat. We landed at Mexico, Texas, which is on the Rio Grande River.
“Girrard, Jeptha Girrard was my Colonel.
Seips was first our Lt. Col., but later on he was made Col.
Brown was Major.
Debers was my Capt.
Boltwood and Smith were my Lts.
Garrett was my Ord. Sgt.
Gaines was a duty Sgt. I don’t recollect name of any other Sgt. So far as I can recollect we only had two Sgts.
We had four corporals. Turner, Moran were two of them; cannot recollect for certain the others, but I think one of them was named Olmstead.
“We were in no battles. We were in a skirmish in Chicihominie [sic] Swamp. We had two men killed there but I cannot recollect their names.”

 

Declaration of Pension, James Malburne, 11 March 1907
“he is the identical person who enrolled at Norfolk, Va. under the name of James Malbron … he was born June 6th, 1827 at Princess Anne County, Virginia. That his several places of residence since leaving the service have been as follows: Norfolk County and Norfolk, Virginia … his post-office address is Chapel St., Ext. Norfolk, County of Norfolk, State of Virginia …
“Also personally appeared Willis Creekmore, residing in Norfolk, Va. and John Portlock, residing in Norfolk County, Virginia … [acquainted with soldier] 35 years and 40 years, respectively …”

 


Application for Reimbursement, Nora Taylor, 10 January 1913
23 years old; residence, Norfolk County, Va.
[relationship to the deceased] granddaughter
[cause of death] pneumonia
[beginning of last sickness] about Dec 1911
[name and post-office address of physicians] Dr. J.J. Quarles, Berkley, Norfolk, Va; Dr. A.B. Green, Berkley, Norfolk, Va.
[pensioner’s residence in last illness] Norfolk Co., Va.
[date of death] November 7, 1912
[burial] Norfolk Co., Va.
Also personally appeared, Florence Slade, RFD 4, Box 41, Norfolk, Va. and Amy Fuller, RFD 4, Box 41, Norfolk, Va.
Persons who nursed the patient — Frank Lovette, Florence Sled, Nora Taylor

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This soldier returned to his birthplace on Virginia’s Eastern Shore after discharge. He’d been hospitalized in Brazos and New Orleans and was sickly the rest of his life. He died in a Baltimore hospital in 1891.

 

Mother – 495,474 / —–, Dinah Moore

 

Declaration for Dependent Mother’s Pension, Dina Moore, 16 January 1891
70 years old; residence, Pungoteague, Accomac Co., Va.; post-office address, Pungoteague, Accomac Co., Va.
“… she is the mother of Moses Moore … in the service of the United States, died in Baltimore, Md. … August 1878, from the effects of rheumatism brought on by exposure in the army. He was treated by a doctor for it the same year he came home out of the war.”
“Also personally appeared, S.E Wise residing at Craddockville, Va., and J.A. Wise, residing at Craddockville, Va … [acquainted with her 20 years and 10 years, respectively …”

 

Declaration for Dependent Mother’s Pension, Dinah Moore, 11 July 1900
75 years old; residence, Craddockville, Accomac Co., Va.; post-office address, Craddockville, Accomac Co., Va.
“the soldier died at Baltimore, Md. … November 1868 of the effects of cold and exposure received in service of war of rebellion. My son was sick from the day of his discharge until his death.”
“Also personally appeared, James Sturgis residing at Craddockville, Va., and John Major, residing at Craddockville, Va … [acquainted with her] 60 years and 55 years, respectively …”

 

General Affidavit, John Bailey and James Sturgis, 18 August 1900
[Bailey] 64 years old; residence, Craddockville, Accomac Co., Va.
[Sturgis] 81 years old; residence, Craddockville, Accomac Co., Va.
“[The soldier] was never married and lived with his mother … from the time of his discharge from the service of War of the Rebellion until a short time before his death when he went to Balto., Md. for treatment during 1891 and died in the Public Hospital.”

 

General Affidavit, Dinah Moore, 27 October 1900
80 years old; residence, Craddockville, Accomac Co., Va.
“I am the claimant abovenamed, and the mother of Moses Moore, who served in the War of the Rebellion in Company ‘F’ 1st Regt. U.S.C. Cavy. instead of Co. ‘F’ 10th Regt. U.S.C. Inf.  as set forth in my application for mother’s pension filed August 8th 1900.”

 

Sworn Statement, Dinah Moore, 22 January 1901
86 years old; residence, Craddockville, Accomac Co., Va.; “The father of the soldier abovenamed was a slave man and he died previous to the enlistment of my son Moses Moore … I cannot recollect the date of my husband’s death. He died a slave. His name was Dennis Moore. …”

 

U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of the Pensions (Form 3-337), 6 June 1901
” … Aug 31/65, Absent sick Post Hospl Brazos;  Oct 31/65 Sick at Corps d’Afrique Hospl, NO. La. … also borne [on the roll] as Moses Moor … Born in Accomac Co., Va. Age 19 years. A laborer.  Dark eyes. Black hair. Light complexion. Height 5 ft 5 in. Name of owner not found. Name of Moses Moore not found on rolls of Co F, 1 U.S.C. Cav. …”

 

General Affidavit, Dinah Moore, 21 August 1901
84 years old; residence, Craddockville, Accomac Co., Va.
“… his discharge paper was lost at the time of his death. The soldier of abovenamed was of dark complexion, black hair, black eyes, and five feet five inches or thereabout. Was from near Pungoteague, Va. and was about 19 years old at enlistment and the soldier was a slave.”
[Note: Information for two people had been entered on this form and then scratched out — E.F. Wharton, 56 [?] years old and James Sturgis, 76 years old — Leslie].

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Getting a pension benefit wasn’t easy. Character was everything. Sometimes the applicant — or the witness —  had to give more than one statement. When the applicant — or the attorney — disputed payment, it could get really messy. However, this is a boon for the researcher because disputes generate information about individuals and the community.

 

Invalid — 1,178,419 / 1,000,076
C-2,563,210 (NC)

 

Sworn Statement, Austin Moody, 23 April 1897
“… a citizen of South Mills, N.C. … was first afflicted with hernia at Brazos Santiago Texas on July the 4th 1865 while working and removing railroad iron …”

 

Sworn Statement, Edmund Proctor & Luke Smith, 24 April 1897
[Proctor] 60 years old and [Smith] 58 years old “citizens of South Mills, Camden Co., N.C. …”Proctor declares and says that he has been knowing said Austin Moody for 12 years and said Moody worked for him in 1885 and 86 and been my neighbor to the present time of times said Moody had to stop work frequently on account of misery in lower part of stomach but has had no medical attention and so the present is not able to do more than 1/2 a man’s labor.
“Luke Smith declares and says he first met claimant in 1865 in Texas said claimant then spoke of misery in lower part of stomach and since 1882 has lived as neighbors and often has had to quit work on account of said complaint. has had no medical attention and at the present time cannot do more than 1/2 of man’s labor …”

 

General Affidavit, Miles Brite & George Hicks, 1 April 1898 
[Brite] 58 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C.; post-office address, South Mills, N.C.
[Hicks] 33 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C.; post-office address, South Mills, N.C.
“[Brite states that] Austin Moody is his near neighbor … Moody has been totally disabled to earn his support by manual labor every since July 1897. His condition is of such if does not get some aid he will have to be put on the county for his support for he has no one legally bound for his support. He is now on destitute circumstances. He greatly needs help.

G.W. Hicks states  … he is near neighbor and often sees [Moody] … he is not able to earn his support by manual labor and he has no one legally bound for his support…”

 

Sworn Statement, Edmund Proctor & Luke Smith, 11 March 1899 
[Proctor] 63 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C.
[Smith] 59 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C. … “Well known to me to be reputable and entitled to credit … they were members of Co. F, the same regiment which Moody belong [sic] to, they further state that they were personally acquainted with Moody from 1863 to now, and they were together every opportunity while in the service .. they knowed [sic] from personal knowledge that Austin Moody was a man of good moral habits, at the time of and prior to the incurrence of hernia in 1865 … ”

 

Sworn Statement, Austin Moody, 8 November 1899 
68 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C.; post-office address, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C. …..”He further states that he contracted hernia while in service at Brazos Santiago, Texas in January 1866. He was detailed from his company to work on the railroad. [illegible] removing said road to Clarksville in Texas. he further testified that he was overstrained by carrying heavy iron. From it he contracted hernia and it grows worse every day … ”

 

Sworn Statement, Dr. Jno. H. Pool, 24 January 1900
nearly 65 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C. …”states that he has been a practising [sic] physician for the past 40 years .. that he has never attended [Austin Moody] as a physician, but has on several occasions sold him as a druggist, liniments etc for rheumatism … he believes the said Moody is an honest and upright citizen … John H. Pool, M.D.

 

Sworn Statement, Ransom Rogers & Miles Brite, 24 January 1900
[Rogers] 56 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C.; post-office address, Rosedale, N.C.
[Brite] 60 years old; residence, South Mills, Camden Co., N.C.; post-office address, South Mills, N.C. ” … well known to be reputable and entitled to credit …  that they are personally acquainted with the claimant … having been his near door neighbor for over 20 years. They further testify that said Moody was taken to his bed sometime in January 1896 with disability for reason of rheumatism and hernia. That he was down near the whole year…”

 

Deposition, Austin Moody, 10 September 1902
about 60 or 70 years old; residence, near South Mills, N.C. ; an invalid  … “I have been drawing a pension two and three years …. I cannot show my pension ctf for the reason that it is locked up at my home and I am now confined to my bed in the home of a neighbor some distance away.

“I had a lawyer in Washington, DC and I understand that he got ten dollars. My check for my first payment called for $360.50. When it came I paid Wylie Taylor twenty dollars but he seemed so dissatisfied that later in the day I gave him ten more and then he seemed to be in better humor. That was all that I ever paid him. I never borrowed money from him and I never owed him for anything except for writing that he did when he helped me get my claim through. He wrote some affidavits for me and that is all that he ever wrote. All that he did for me and all that he could charge me for was work that he did in my pension claim. He acted as my local pension atty. and it was for clmt work that I paid him the $30 referred to above.”

 

Deposition, Greenwood Griffin, 7 January 1903
28 [38?] years old; residence, South Mills, N.C.; occupation, “am paralyzed I can do no work”  … “Austin Moody died about last Oct. I recollect when he received his pension nearly three years ago. He received something over three hundred dollars. He paid Wyley G. Taylor about thirty dollars with the first payment for work he did on his pension claim. I was there when it was paid. The money was paid Wyley Taylor in the store of John Taylor. I did not count the bills when Wyley received them but I recollect the amount was about thirty dollars. I heard Wyley said afterwards that he got about thirty dollars and I heard Austin Moody say that he paid him about thirty dollars so I believe that was about the amount. No, it was not more than thirty dollars. That was just about the figure nor was it much if any less than thirty dollars. I only saw Austin Moody make one payment to Wyley so I did not know the amount was but I told you I heard from both afterwards that Wyley got about $30 but whether he received part of the $30 when I saw Mr. Moody give his money and part later on I am not able to say. All I know is that I saw Mr. Moody give Wyley some more out of his first payment after he had his check cashed by John Bradshaw and later on both of them Taylor and Moody said that the amount was about $30 paid and received.”

 

Deposition, Wyley G. Taylor, 8 January 1903
50 years old; occupation, school teaching, farming, I am a pension atty … “Austin Moody claimed that he paid me $30 out of his first payment but $26 is all that he paid me. The way that I came to make the charge or rather to receive the $26 is because I paid all the notary fees and I loaned him small amounts at times. I did not take receipts on what he owned but I kept an account myself. I do not recollect who was present when Moody paid me the $26. He paid it all at one payment and asked me if I was satisfied and I said yes. Before that he stated to me that he would give me $20 out of every hundred but I stated that that was too much. Austin Moody took his check to John Bradshaw and had it cashed. I had nothing to do with it. I was not present when it was cashed.
“Austin Moody died last Oct … but I cannot give exact date.”

 

Deposition, W.W. Davis, 8 January 1903
21 years; residence, South Mills, N.C.; occupation, farmer … “I know Wyley G. Taylor well and some time back I was talking to him and remarked to him that I heard that he had trouble of some kind regarding pensions and asked him if there was anything to it. He then said that the one trouble that he had was that the law allowed him to charge only ten dollars but that if the parties  … wanted to pay extra that he considered it his and that Austin Moody gave him $30 when his claim was allowed and that was  [illegible] gave him sixty. No he did not say that Moody gave him more than $30 nor did he say that [illegible] gave him $160. Said Moody promised him more but never gave it. Wyley stated that the money was given him by parties named above to pay for all writing that he did, putting on seals and furnishing paper and stamps. That’s all that I know about the matter and I saw no money change hands.”

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The soldier drowned in Texas before his service ended. His brother’s application for pension benefits includes inconsistent information about the birth dates and dates of death for parents and siblings. That same brother later resided at the National Soldiers’ Home in Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Virginia. The location was sometimes incorrectly reported in this application as “Elizabeth City, Virginia” or “Elizabeth County, Virginia.”

 

Invalid – 1,191,575 / —–
Brother – 326,938 / —–, Peter Minkins

 

Declaration of Pension for Dependent Brothers and Sisters, Peter Minkins, 18 May 1885
22 years old; residence, Soldiers Home, Elizabeth City County, Virginia;  post-office address, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.
“That there was no legal guardian … John Minkins died by drowning while crossing the river near Galveston, State of Texas, while in the line of his duty, and properly detailed in carrying the mails … on the not known day of not known about A.D. 1865 … his mother lived until about the year 1875 and drawed [sic] about one hundred dollars on a/c of death of aforesaid John Minkins … [surviving siblings who were 16 years old at the time of the soldier’s death] were Nelson Minkins died about the year 1878 and Amie Minkins died in 1869; that said brothers and sisters were the issue of the parents of said soldier…
Ned Minkins, child of Malinda and William Minkins, born not known
Frank Minkins, Dec[eased], child of Malinda and William Minkins, born not known
Nelson Minkins, Dec[eased], child of Malinda and William Minkins, born not known
Junius Minkins, child of Malinda and William Minkins, born not known
“That the parents were married under the names William Minkins (Malinda’s name not known) at West Point, State of Virginia

 

Declaration for an Original Pension for a Brother, Julius Minkins, 16 April 1890
37 years old; post-office address, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.
“He is the brother of John Minkins … who died in the service in Texas … he was partly dependent on said brother for support … Julius Minkins was born February 12th,1853 … Also personally appeared Warren Minkins … and Henry Rone …”

 

General Affidavit, Alfred Blow, 12 January 1891
50 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Virginia; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“That Julias Minkins was dependent on his brother John Minkins for his support when he was a boy. Johnie Minkins used to give Julias Minkins money for his support and lived near them.”

 

General Affidavit, Henry Roane, 12 January 1891
60 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“That Julias Minkins was dependent on his brother Johnie Minkins for support since he was a boy. Johnie Minkins used to give Julias Minkins money for his support. I lived as near neighbour [sic].”

 

General Affidavit, John Miller, 27 January 1891
77 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth City County, Va.; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“That he knew about when Julias Minkins was born, that he is now about 38 years of age, that he knew that the father of Julias Minkins died in the year 1878  — I dug the grave for both his father and mother. There was about one and a half years difference in the deaths of his father and mother. His father died first.”

 

General Affidavit, Jacob Thornton, 6 November 1897
45 years old; residence, Hampton, Elizabeth County, Va.; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“I know that Billey and Melinda Minkins, the father and mother of Julian Minkins died as follows: Billey Minkins died in the year 1873 and Melinda Minkins died about 18 months after …. I know this because I was at their house when they died and saw them laid out for burial. I recognized them when they were in the coffin.”

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Killed in action six months after his enlistment? Confirmed. Born in St. Mary’s County, Maryland? Confirmed. A young widow with two children? Maybe.  

 

Widow — 105,232 / 99,305, Mary E. Milburn
Minor – 406,701 / —– , Gustavus Milburn 

Note: Mary’s claim gave the soldier’s name as “Charles Milburn” which was the name under which he enlisted; Gustavus made a claim several years later and reported the soldier’s name was “Sandy Milburn.” Two pension index cards were created but on pension application folder. Please see the comments section which explains how the discrepancy was resolved — Leslie.]

 

Sworn Statement, Mary E. Milburn, [undated]
“[T]here was one child, born to her by her husband, Charles A. Milburn during her marriage that was living at the time of her husband’s death, to wit Ann Rebecca Milburn who was born about 1st December 1859, and now resides in the City of Norfolk, State of Virginia; and that after her husband’s death, to wit, on the ___ day of June A.D. 1865 she had by him another child, Frederick Abraham, now living with her in Norfolk.”

 

Widow’s Claim for Pension, Mary E. Milburn, 8 August 1865
22 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.
“That her maiden name was Mary E. Mason and that she was married to said Charles A. Milburn on or about the 25th day of December 1857, at Great Mills, in the County of St. Marys and State of Virginia [sic] …”
“Also personally appeared before me Charles E. Raboteau [sp?] and Alice Tarlton, residents of Norfolk City & County . .”
[Note: St. Mary’s County is in Maryland — not Virginia — Leslie]

 

Department of the Interior, Pension Office (Form 14), 15 November 1865
“Were there two Milburns in Co. B?”

 

Widow’s Claim for Pension, Mary E. Milburn, 16 July 1866
23 years old; residence, Norfolk, Virginia … “That she was married to Charles A. Milburn on or about the 25th day of December 1858, at Great Mills in the County of St. Mary’s in the State of Maryland by Rev. Father McMullen and that she knows of no record evidence of said marriage and believes that none is in existence. …. [her husband] died at or near Newport News in the State of Virginia [in] December 1864, while in the discharge of his duty, at the hands of armed rebels by musket shots (shot while on guard) … Also personally appeared before me Alice Tarlton and Thomas H. Milburn, residents of the City of Norfolk … and that the said Alice was an eye-witness of the marriage ceremony of the applicant and Chas. A. Milburn & said Thomas knew that they cohabited as man and wife about six years.”

 

Widow’s Claim for Pension, Mary E. Milburn, 5 April 1867
25 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Box 270, Norfolk, Va. … “she was married to said Chas. Alex. Milburn on or about the 25th day of December 1859 at Allston’s Plantation, Md in [State of Maryland] by Father McMullen … She further declares that said Chas. Alexr Milburn her husband, died in the service of the United States on [the] James River … on or about the 11th day of December 1864 of gunshot wounds, received on a tugboat in charge of Capt. Sawtell, sent to procure rock for paving … [her children with her husband who were under 16 years old at the time of his death] Ellen Ann Rebecca born 25th December 1860 … Frederick Abraham born 12 June 1865″

 

Sworn Statement, Jane Jones & Rosa Turner, 5 August 1867
[Jones] residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va. and [Turner] residence, City of Norfolk, Va. … “they were well acquainted with Mary E. Milburn and her late husband Chas. Alexander Milburn … having known them for the space of twenty years, and that they were present and eye-witnesses of the birth of Ellen Ann Rebecca [a child of the couple] which occurred at Allston’s Plantation in the County of St. Mary’s and State of Maryland on the 25th day of Dec 1859. They further swear that there is no record, public or private, of the birth of this child, nor was there a physician present …”

 

Sworn Statement, Jane Jones & Rosa Turner, 5 August 1867
[Jones] residence, Portsmouth, Norfolk Co., Va. and [Turner] residence, City of Norfolk, Va. … “they  were well acquainted with Mary E. Milburn having known her for the space of twenty years … they were present at and eye-witnesses at the birth of Frederick Abraham … which occurred on the 12th day of June 1865 at Norfolk in the County of Norfolk. They further swear that there is no record, public or private, of the birth of this child, nor was there a physician present …”

 

Claim for Widow’s Pension With Minor Children, Mary E. Milburn, 21 August 1867
residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, Box 270 Norfolk, Va. … “Charles Milburn was mustered as a Private on 22 February 1864 … killed in action 6 December 1864 … Charles A. Milburn and Mary E. Mason were married 25 December 1858 at St. Mary’s, Maryland shown by testimony of a person who was present and evidence of cohabitation … [their children] Ellen Ann Rebecca born 25 December 1859 who will be 16 years old 24 December 1875 [and] Frederick Abraham born June 1865 who will be 16 years old 11 June 1881 … ”

 

General Affidavit, Charles Tarlton, 31 March 1890
75 years old; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“I knew Sandy Milburn long before the war. He married my daughter and had only one child by her and it was Augustus. …. This is his son and the only one and I have been knowing him all of my lifetime.”

 

Claimant’s Statement, Gustavus Milburn, 11 March 1891
residence, Hampton, Va.; post-office address, Hampton, Va.
“That Sandy Milburn, claimant’s father … was five feet six inches in height, weighed about 180 lbs., was of heavy frame, large face, clean shaved, brown-black color, black eyes, short black hair, age at time of enlistment 25 years; by occupation a farm laborer; was born in St. Mary’s Co., Md. and that he was owned by a widow named Bower [sp?] and that he enlisted at Port Smith [sic], Va. and that he was shot on James River, Va. in the year 1865.”

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The soldier’s pension application was hindered when his attorney went out of business and left the state with documents and paperwork.  Two cousins also enlisted: Humphrey McCoy served in the 1st U.S. Colored Cavalry, Company B and Moses McCoy served in 36th U.S. Colored Troops.  Peter’s widow had “three acres and a hut near Great Bridge, Norfolk County, Virginia. The couple’s former slaveowner supported the widow’s claim.

 

Invalid — 879, 471 / 688,044
Widow — 811,977 / 607,397, Lucinda McCoy

 

Deposition, Humphrey McCoy, 2 November 1891
44 years old; residence, 70 Willoughby St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, huckster …”I have known [the claimant] all my life …”

 

Deposition (Form 3-446), Nelson Portlock, 2 November 1891
51 years old; post-office address, Great Bridge, Norfolk Co., Va. “[The claimant and I] served together and have been neighbors continuously since our discharge from service…”

 

Deposition, Peter McCoy, 2 November 1891
56 years old; post-office address, Berkley, Norfolk Co., Va.

 

Deposition, Emmerson Cuffee, 19 May 1893
about 68 years old; post-office address, Berkley, Norfolk Co., Va.; occupation, farmer … “I know Peter McCoy. I been knowing since before the war … ”

 

Deposition, Jeffrey Cousins [Carson?], 20 May 1893
about 53 years old; post-office address, Berkley, Va.; occupation, farmer … “I have been acquainted with [Peter McCoy] ever since I have been big enough to know anything ….”

 

Deposition, Peter McCoy, 22 May 1893
about 58 years old; post-office address, Berkley, Va.; occupation, farmer …

 

General Affidavit, Peter McCoy, 24 June 1895
residence, Berkley, Norfolk County, Virginia … “That he cannot return his old certificate and voucher because he deposited them with one C.B. Roper, a notary public and alleged pension atty. of 31 Bank St., Norfolk, Va., about 2 years ago for the purpose of having his claim completed, that the said C.B. Roper has failed in business and left this state taking with him all his books and papers.”

 

Questionnaire (Form 3-402), Peter McCoy, 4 June 1898
[married] Lucinda McCoy, maiden name Lucinda McCoy
[when, where, by whom] married before the war by my owner
[previously married] never married before
[living children] Mary born 1863; Frances born 1866; Sarah born 1868; Martha born 1870; Josephine born 1874; Denorah born 1877. India born 1880; Peter Thomas born 1882; Estell born 1884.

 

Deposition, Peter McCoy, 11 October 1901
65 years old; residence, near Great Bridge, Norfolk County, Va…” I was born a slave; was owned by William H. Ellis. My father was Daniel McCoy, and it was from him that I took my name…I was never on detached service … I gave my discharge to Mr. Brown when I was trying to get a bounty and it was never returned to me. I got the bounty all right but I cannot recollect what the amount was…prior to enlistment was a farm laborer.

“I was in the following engagements: Chicihomie [sic], Drury Bluff, Petersburg. We had only one man killed out of my company and he was killed at Chickihominie [sic], but I cannot recollect his name.

Jeffrey Garrard was my Colonel;  Brown was our Lt.; Col. Sypes was our Major; Archie McIntosh was my Captain; Spencer was my 1st Lt.; LaBode was my 2d Lt.

Albert Long was our 1st Ord., Sgt., but he was succeeded by John Sales.
James Pool, Enos Dennis were my bunk and messmates in service.

Milo B. Stevens was my attorney in Washington, but Mr. Brown did my writing from here. Brown charged me very little for what he did — a few cents each time he wrote a paper. He is now dead. Stevens got ten dollars when the claim was allowed.

Enos Dennis and Humphrey McCoy were my witnesses. They charged me nothing. I was also a witness for them. I never got over or under $8 pension … George Hall of Great Bridge executes my vouchers. He charges me fifty cents for each voucher executed. He always swears me. I have never pawned my pension papers.

“I have been married only once; married Lucinda McCoy so her marriage to me did not change her name. We were married near Great Bridge, Va. Neither of us had been previously married and she is still living with me. We have only one child under 16 years of age, viz. Estelle McCoy and she is now 13 years of age.”

 

Sworn Statement, Wm. H. Etheredge, 23 July 1904
“To Whom It May Concern — I hereby certify that Lucinda McCoy the bearer of this note is the widow of Peter McCoy (dec’d). They came together as man and wife according to a customer in the state then followed. I can’t say positively when this took place but to the best of my knowledge, it was in the fall of the year 1861 or /62. Peter went into the Northern Army sometime during the war, got through safe and returned home at the end of the war and lived together as man and wife up to his death in May 1904. Peter the husband of Lucinda was a slave and belonged to the undersigned.”

 

Sworn Statement, E. Lumford, Henry Sivils, Casper Tillery,  4 November 1904
[Lumford, 64 years old], [Sivils, 63 years old], [Tillery, 46 years old] … “E. Lumford knows of the death of Peter McCoy only by the statements of neighbors that were present at the funeral & saw him buried. Henry Sivils knows of his death by the reason of he was in the immediate neighborhood at the time of his death, was attending John McCoy, a cousin of Peter McCoy during his last sickness. Casper Tillery knows of the death of Peter McCoy from the fact he was present when he died at twelve minutes to five 3rd day of May 1904. He was at the funeral & saw him buried. Each of the above witnesses certifies that they have been knowing Lucinda McCoy since they were children & have been living in the immediate neighborhood with each other all of their lives …”

 

Sworn Statement, Edmond Clemens & George Thornton, 25 July 1905
[Clemens, 76 years old], [Thornton, 29 years old]; residence [for both], Great Bridge, Virginia … “That they lived and have lived for more than 25 years in immediate neighborhood with Lucinda McCoy widow of Peter McCoy deceased; That Lucinda McCoy has a life interest in about three acres of land and a hut near Great Bridge in Norfolk County, Virginia left by her husband at his death which occurred on the 3rd day of May 1904. Value of said land and hut being less than $200.00 and her estate of less value than $25.00. That said valuations of real estate at $200.00 and personal estate at $25.00 are the highest. That said real and personal is the only property she possesses and has not disposed of any property since her husband’s death May 3rd 1904. That Peter McCoy was a poor sickly man and left his wife at his death in very humble, if not really needy, claimant compelled to work daily for her support.”

 

Sworn Statement, Lucinda McCoy, 25 July 1905
post-office address, Great Bridge, Norfolk Co., Va. … “That she has a life interest in three acres of land and a hut near Great Bridge, Norfolk County, Virginia valued at about $200.00 and personal property at same place worth about $5.00 … [she has not] encumbered the said land. That she has no bonds, stocks or other valuables or property that as above. That she is a poor woman without any income save her daily labor and asks that this claim may be made special. That her husband’s funeral and sickness before death caused expenses which she worked out and paid … ”

 

Sworn Statement, Leroy W. Nicholas, Commissioner of Revenue, Second District of Norfolk County, Virginia, 28 March 1906
“… have made a careful examination of said lists for the years 1904 and 1905 and find that there is assessed against
Peter McCoy … personal property … 1904 … $8.00
Peter McCoy … real estate … 1905 … $260.00
Peter McCoy … personal property …1905 … $dead
Peter McCoy … real estate … 1905 … $dead
Lucinda McCoy … personal property … 1904 and 1905 … $nothing
Lucinda McCoy … real estate … 1904 and 1905 … $nothing

Lucinda McCoy widow of Peter McCoy has nothing additionally assessed with her name for year 1905 over and above the estate standing in the name of Peter McCoy in the year 1904”

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The soldier survived a gunshot wound to the head at the Battle of the Crater in Petersburg, Virginia where he’d been detailed to the Ambulance Corps as a stretcher-bearer. He outlived one wife, was divorced from the second, and separated from the third. His cousin Peter McCoy also served in 1st U.S. Colored Cavalry, Company B and his brother Moses McCoy served in the 36th U.S. Colored Troops, Company E. Dozens of witnesses deliver robust profiles of the soldier and his widow and their struggle to persevere through the chaos.

Invalid — 635,663 / 671,117
Widow — 1,075,219 / 821,546, Delia McCoy 

Chancery Suit, Corporation Court of the City of Norfolk, Mary Jane McCoy by her next friend Edmund Ferebee vs. Humphrey McCoy, 11 April 1888
“… the court being of opinion that the charges of desertion and adultery are fully proved doth adjudge order and decree that the marriage heretofore solemnized Humphrey McCoy and Mary Jane McCoy formerly Mary Jane Wilson be and the same is hereby dissolved and the said Mary Jane McCoy be forever divorced a vinculo matrimonii from the said Humphrey McCoy.
“And the court doth further adjudge order and decree that the said Humphrey McCoy do pay to the plaintiff her costs by her expended in the prosecution of this suit.”

Affidavit for General Purposes, Isaac Kellum & Armstead Tucker, 16 July 1888
“[They know him, were in same company with him] and were engaged in the same action at the Crater when he was wounded, they state while they did not see the wound when he received it, they saw him in the hospital and know of the fact that he was wounded in the right side of the head by gunshot, that he was sent with us as invalid to Texas … we live close neighbors to said McCoy … both of these affiants were detailed as stretcher-bearers and it was their duty to carry wounded from the field of action … [Kellum and Taylor] carried him to the rear so as to be treated by Surgeon. Lt. Bradford S. Manley was surgeon of the regiment and attended the claimant in field hospital …”

Isaac Kellum, Deposition, 22 July 1889
63 years old; post-office address, 65 Queen St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, laborer …  “He enlisted the same time that I did … I have known him ever since the war. I have seen him every day. We have worked together a part of the time.”

Sworn Statement, James Langley & James Woodhouse, 23 July 1888
“[Humphrey McCoy] while at the battle of the Crater and acting as stretcher-bearer and help to wounded at or near [Petersburg, Virginia on or about 30th July 1864] received a gunshot wound in right side of the head … we were in the same company as said McCoy, James Langley being 2nd Sgt in Co B 1st Reg and Jas. Woodhouse being a private in said company, that they live close neighbors to said McCoy and have known him since the war, that he is very much disabled from said wound and unable to support himself, they also testify that McCoy was treated in the field hospital and said wound affected him until his discharge and also until the present time.”

Deposition, Armistead Tucker, 25 July 1889
45 years old; post-office address, 22 Kent St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, laborer … “I have known the claimant ever since 1863 … He received a wound in the temple. I think the right temple in front of Petersburgh, Va. July 1864 at the battle of the Crater … I saw him the next day after he was wounded. I saw the wound … It did not appear to be a very bad wound.”

“I have known Humphrey McCoy ever since his discharge. I have seen him very often, sometimes every day or so, and sometimes once in six months. He lives about a half a mile from me now.”

Deposition, James Woodhouse, 26 July 1889
“about 38 or 39 years old, I don’t know exactly”; residence, 300 [?] Queen St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, laborer …. “I have known the claimant ever since 1862. He was in the service with me. … I think he received a ‘lick’ from a bombshell in front of Petersburg, Va. It was somewhere about his head … I was on detailed duty at the battle of the Crater. I don’t remember which duty I was on.”

“I have known McCoy ever since discharge. He has lived within a quarter of a mile of me ever since the war.”

Deposition, James Langley, 27 July 1889
54 years old;  post-office address, 17 Brickers Ave., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, laborer … “[Langley said that he asked McCoy how he had been hurt and McCoy said] that while he was with the ambulance corps, removing the dead and wounded, the rebels came upon them and he was burnt by powder about the eyes. I did not see him [illegible] as I was on detached service with the post commissary.”

Deposition, Humphrey McCoy, 31 July 1889
40 years old; occupation, porter in store; post-office address, 326 Church St., Norfolk, Va. “… I was struck by a minie ball. I think George Whitis was with me, carrying the other end of the stretcher but he is dead. No one else was with me at the time. My company was stationed in the rear.
“When I was struck I fell to the ground. Someone stood me on my feet and walked beside me to the surgeon who belonged to some other regiment. I never knew who he was.
“About the next day I was treated by the surgeons of my regiment, Dr. Manley and Dr. Gray. I did not go to hospital. I was off duty only two days. Captain McIntyre commanded my company at the time.
“Q. What members of your company knew that you had this wound at the battle of the Crater?
A.   Isaac Kellum, Armstead Tucker, and Jim Langley of Norfolk, Va. Edmund Jones at Hampton. and Jim Woodhouse of Company D, I think … while at Brazos I went blind. I was blind for about three months … I took pneumonia from swimming my horse across the Chickahominy Swamp, Va. about Mar or April 1863 …
“I was kicked on the left foot while drilling at Hampton, Va. about three months after I enlisted. It does not hurt me now.”

Deposition, Lewis Dawley, 2 August 1889
53 years old; post-office address, 379 Church St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, truckman … “I was a sergeant of company B … [Humphrey McCoy] was a member of my co. … I did not know him before enlistment. I have known him ever since. … I was not at the battle of Deep Bottom or the Crater. I was on detailed duty at Warrenton Junction at that time.”

Deposition, Israel Armstrong, 7 August 1889
58 years old; 49 St. Paul’s St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, laborer … “I did not know [McCoy] before he enlisted… I was present at the battle of the Crater. I was detailed as stretcher-bearer in the ambulance corps, at that time but I do not remember hearing of McCoy being wounded or injured at that time. I remember seeing him in camp. We were encamped on the left side of Petersburgh …”
“I have known him ever since discharge. He lives near me …. I have seen him about once or twice a week ever since discharge.”

Deposition, Isaac Moseley, 13 September 1889
44 years old; post-office address, 13 Wise St., Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; occupation, truck farmer … “I had been acquainted with him two years when he enlisted. … I lived at that time at Sewall’s Point, Norfolk Co., Va. and he lived ten miles from me at Great Bridge, Norfolk Co., Va. and I used to meet him often at church. We enlisted about the same time and were discharged and came home together.”
“I was on detailed service a good part of the time cooking for the brigade butchers and in the commissary department.”
“I was not present at the battle of the Crater near Petersburg, Va.  I was on reserve picket duty.”
“I have seen him about once a week ever since discharge.”

General Affidavit, Cornelius Gray, 1 May 1890
49 years old; residence, 80 Henry St., Norfolk, Va.; post-office address, 80 Henry St., Norfolk, Va. … “I was in line of duty at the same time when [McCoy] got struck with a piece of a shell … [McCoy] was carrying wounded men off the field on stretchers … I was a corporal of the ambulance corps at the time … he was under my command … ”

Marriage License [copy], Humphrey McCoy & Delia Cargo, 13 July 1892
Norfolk, Va.; husband, 44 years old; wife, 28 years old; both, widowed; both born, Norfolk Co., Va.; both resided, Norfolk Co., Va.; husband’s parents, H. and Hannah McCoy; wife’s parents, [blank]; husband’s occupation, driver; officiant, Rev. J.E. Lovitt

Deposition, Humphrey McCoy, 8 May 1893
45 years old; residence, 70 Willoughby St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, express wagon driver “… my attorney was a man named Brown … I don’t know where Brown is now; he left here five or six years ago; I then made a contract with A.M. McCormack & Sons of Washington, DC … then Mr. W.R. Drury was my attorney …”

Deposition, John Binford, 9 May 1893
55 years old; residence, 31 Scott St., Norfolk, Va.; no occupation
Q. Do you know Humphrey McCoy?
A.  I only know one Humphrey McCoy. He belong to the 36th USCT, I believe….”

Deposition, Anderson Beasley, 12 May 1893
about 49 years old; no occupation; “I live at the new turnpike road at the Richard Oden‘s place …
“Q. Do you know Humphrey McCoy?
A. Yes, sir. 20 years.
Q.  How long have you known him?
A. For more than 20 years …”

General Affidavit, Louis Dawley & Isaac Armstrong, 29 November 1893 
[Dawley] 51 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 379 Church St., Norfolk, Va.
[Armstrong] 61 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 49 St. Paul’s St., Norfolk, Va.
“… Dawley says that he has known pensioner for 30 years … Armstrong has known pensioner for 40 years …”

Deposition, Humphrey McCoy, 8 May 1901
54 years old; post-office address, 506 Princess Anne Ave, Norfolk, Va. … “I am a member of the Hampton Va. Home.    I have never had any other name. My father’s name was Humphrey McCoy. My mother’s Hannah McCoy. Robert Casson was my owner. I had 4 brothers … Charles, William and Moses. Moses and I were the only ones in the Army. I was born in Norfolk Co., Va. and have resided in this county all my life. ”

“Garrard was my Colonel. Brown and Seip were Majors at different times. McIntyre was my Capt. Cass and Vandervoort were Lts. Lawton, Sayles, Langley, and Pearce were Sgts. Anthony James, Henry James, Enos Dennis were Corpls. Henry McCrea, James Pool, and Peter McCoy were my tentmates.
“We were in a skirmish at Chickahominy Swamp. I was then dismounted and made a stretcher-bearer and so continued until we went to Texas …. Armstead Tucker and Isaac Kellam were witnesses in my claim.”
“Delia is the name of my wife. We were married in 1891 in Norfolk by Rev. Goodman Bray…. My present wife had a former husband Shack White. They separated about 1885 and I don’t know whether he is living. They were never divorced to my knowledge.”
“My vouchers are executed at the Hampton Home. My pension certificate and discharge are at the Hampton Home.”
“I was only 16 when I enlisted  and had been working on a farm when I enlisted.”

General Affidavit, Robert Mosley, 14 July 1908
68 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 67 Star St., Norfolk, Va. … “That I am a cousin of Humphrey McCoy. That Humphrey McCoy’s first wife Mary Etta McCoy contracted smallpox during the epidemic of that disease in Norfolk about the year 1870, and died of said disease. I did not see her after she died but went to the house before she was buried and know the circumstances concerning her death …”

General Affidavit, Amanda Perry, 14 July 1908
52 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 16 Bonnetts Ct., Norfolk, Va. … “That I was well and personally acquainted with the late Humphrey McCoy and his first wife Mary Etta McCoy, and at time Mary Etta McCoy died, I was living less than one block from her. She died during a smallpox epidemic at Norfolk, Va. on Willoughby St. with smallpox not very long after the Civil War, not later than 1870 I think.  I did not see her after death but know well the day she was said to have died also the night she was carried out to be buried but did not see her carried out; and have never seen her since so she must have died as reported.”
[NOTE: According to the 1908 City Directory, page 472, Amanda Perry lives at 384 Charlotte St. and Andrew Perry lives at 16 Bonnott.
But in the directory’s reverse address index, page 770, Andrew Perry lives at “16 Bonnot [ — north from 18 Wilson’s av]. The entry just above is for “Bonney’s Court  [ — north from 238 Charlotte]. The reverse address index (on page 772) shows that the dwelling at 384 Charlotte St. is occupied (or owned) by Edith A. Halstead. Time to get a map! — Leslie]

Transcript from Record of Deaths, Department of Health, Norfolk, Virginia, Humphrey McCoy, 22 June 1908
Date of death: June 15, 1908 … Age: 62 … Social condition: Married … Occupation: Teamster … Cause of death: Cerebral apoplexy … Place of death: Norfolk Co., Va.  … Place of burial: Soldiers Home … Attending physician: [illegible] … Undertaker: Jas. E. Jones”

General Affidavit, Teney Gray, 20 July 1908
58 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 412 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va. … “… well and personally acquainted with Mrs. Delia McCoy since well before she was 14 fourteen years [sic]  old … claimant and soldier were never divorced but did not continue to live together during last seven years of soldier’s life … owing to soldier’s cruelty in many ways to claimant. Claimant was with soldier when he died, helping to nurse him. I live a close neighbor to soldier’s home …”

General Affidavit, Catharine Wilson, 20 July 1908
63 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 89 Goff St., Norfolk, Va. … “I have known Delia McCoy all of her life …”

General Affidavit, Delia McCoy, 20 July 1908
44 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 10 Wise St., Norfolk, Va.; “That the marriage of the soldier and myself was my first and only marriage and the third marriage of soldier … I was unable to continue living with soldier as he was a very cruel man, he whipped me and he was also living in adultery in same house with me … ”

General Affidavit, Randolph Green, 30 July 1908
58 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.;   “That I first knew Humphrey McCoy when he came home from Civil War in 1866 as near as I remember. I lived about 50 yards from him and know he was not married prior to his marriage to Mary Etta Land. This wife only lived about a year or two and died with smallpox on Willoughby St., Norfolk, Va. That he remained unmarried from her death untill [sic] his marriage to Mary Jane McCoy his second wife & that he did not again marry from her divorce from him untill [sic] he married the claimant Delia McCoy with whom he lived as husband and wife until about seven years ago when they separated. They were never divorced.”

General Affidavit, Tiney Gray & Sarah Jenifer, 28 October 1916
[Gray] about 70 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va; post-office address, 1002 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va.
[Jennifer] 50 years old; residence, Norfolk, Norfolk Co., Va.; post-office address, 713 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va.
“That they have been well and personally acquainted with the claimant Mrs. Delia McCoy for 30 years and 25 years last past; that they were personally acquainted with her husband Mr. Humphrey McCoy for 35 and 20 years before his death in June 1908 …”

Form 3-289c, Delia McCoy, 3 February 1917
51 years old; post-office address, 713 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va. …”[Humphrey McCoy] was buried at the Soldiers’ Home.
“I was married to him in this city under my then name Delia McCoy, by Rev. _____ Bray of St. Luke’s Church, at the home of Rev. Bray over 20 years ago. I don’t know the exact date. I cannot remember dates much.
“Q. A copy of the public record of the marriage shows that Rev. J.E. Lovitt married Humphrey McCoy and Delia Cargo, how do you explain that.
A.  I was married to Humphrey McCoy by Rev. Bray, I have my marriage certificate given to us shortly after we were married. [The Special Examiner noted that she produced the marriage certificate — Leslie]. … He was in the Soldiers Home for a while but died in his home on Maltby Ave., ext’d on Ocean View R.R. I was not legally separated from him … but we were good friends and I visited him, and if there was anything I could do for him I would do it. We simply could not get along, he was very cross. I worked out with white people, work out now, till I got sick last September. I was right there when he died. He fell in the street, they took him to his home, I was sent for, when I got there he was dying, did not recognize anyone after I got there, died in about a half-hour.
“I was born near North West, Norfolk Co., Va., close to a church called Bethel. I do not know the date of my birth or year. I think I am 51 years old …. My parents were Eli and Sylvia Cargo. I think my mother said I was born the year before the war ceased…
“When I was a small child I was brought to Deep Creek by my mother, my father died before I could remember. She cooked for a Mr. _____ Roper, about 5 years then my mother moved to Norfolk City, I came with her. I was about 8 years old when I came to Norfolk … I do not know where I lived in 1870 and in 1880.  I had the following brothers, Charles, died when I was a child; James Cargo, do not know where he is. Eli Cargo, lived near Burden Station, was there when last heard from, and Dan Cargo who is dead. All my sisters are dead. They were named Martha Ann, Caroline, Mary Jane, and Sarah. I lived with my mother on Freemason Street till she died, when I was about 12 years. After that I lived with Harriet Gould, on Newton St., she is living, on Wilson Ave. I was with her until I was grown. She took in washing and I helped her.”

“Q. Did you have any children [before your marriage to Humphrey McCoy]?
A. Yes, I had one child Chas. White by Shack White.  I don’t know if he is 30 or 27. He is away, went to New York 8 years ago. I don’t know his address.”

“Q. Where is Shack White? I don’t know, sir. he is living here in town somewheres. … [When Humphrey McCoy died] I lived at 10 Wise St., with a family, Fenton and Harriet Roberts, rented a room from them. I lived there about four years, when Harriet Roberts died, Then I moved here to this house with Jane Clark, now dead, and her daughter Nannie Young. Fenton Roberts is living at same house. Tiney Gray and Sarah Juniper have known me 25 or 30 years …. Humphrey McCoy has one brother living, Moses McCoy and one sister, Caroline Hodges.”

Form 3-289c, Lizzie Bright, 5 February 1917
50 years old; post-office address, 728 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va.; wife of Wm. Bright, works on wharf … “I have known the claimant Delia McCoy since she was a young girl … No, sir, she was never married to Shack White … No, sir, she was never known as Delia White… I know her brother, I called him Eli Cowan. His name may be Cargo, but I called him Cowan.”
“Q. Has she lived with any man as his wife since she separated from [Humphrey McCoy]?
A.  No, sir, she has lived as an honest widow since her husband’s death, has worked hard and supported herself by her own work, worked for white people stayed with them at night at times. She first had a room with Harriet Roberts and when she died she took a room with Jane Clark, and has been there ever since, across the street from here. Jane Clark is dead, and now her daughter has her house. All these people are and were respectable people.
“I knew Humphrey McCoy from my girlhood days, but know nothing about his wife or wives before he married Delia. I knew him from his driving on the streets. I knew he had children, lawful children, from what I heard before he married Delia …. I know Shak White when I see him, but I do not know where he lives or works, he told me last summer he worked at Ocean View.”

Form 3-289c, Caroline Hodges, 6 February 1917
about 62 years old; post-office address, 912 Dolphin St., Norfolk, Va.; widow of Alonzo Hodges, occupation, housework … “Humphrey McCoy was my own brother. He was married three times …. His first wife, Mary Etta, died at my father’s house on Willoughby Street, this city, many years ago … His next wife was named Jane, we called her Jane, not Mary Jane … she died long ago on Princess Anne Ave. I went to her funeral. His last wife is the claimant Delia McCoy … She was at his burial, was buried at the Soldiers Home, I saw him buried.”

Form 3-289c, Fenton Roberts, 6 February 1917
about 66 years old; post-office address, 1112 Wise St., Norfolk, Va.; occupation; working in planing mill … “I have known Delia McCoy for over 15 years. When I first knew her she was the wife of Humphrey McCoy … After he died she moved to this house, then No. 10, and rented a room from me about 4 years, can’t say just how long, soon after my wife died she moved on Princess Anne Ave., where she is now… She supported herself while in my house by working in service, she paid her room rent herself regularly.”

Form 3-289c, Moses McCoy, 7 February 1917
about 74 years old; post-office address, National Soldiers’ Home, Va.; no occupation … “Humphrey McCoy was my brother, he was about 2 years younger than I was.
“He was married three times only. His first wife died long ago, in my father’s house in Norfolk, Va …. He next married a big yellow woman named Mary Jane. They were divorced I heard. His last wife is the claimant Delia. He was separated from her, was over here in the Home, I brought him here, he was sick, but he died in Norfolk, Va., on Maltby Ave., ext’d. He was buried over here.
“I knew the claimant before her marriage to my brother ..she has a son by [Shack White], I think Shack’s name was White, Iknow his given name was Shack, a big fat fellow.
“I don’t know anything about claimant since my brother’s death, I have been in this Home all the time, and when I go to Norfolk I don’t go near her. Her reputation was not good before my brother married her….”

Form 3-289c, Teeny Gray, 8 February 1917
70 years old; post-office address, 1002 Princess Anne Ave., Norfolk, Va.; occupation, housework …”I have known Delia McCoy since she was wearing short frocks, over 30 years ago. I knew her mother, but forget her name, nor can I think of claimant’s maiden name. … She lived close to me nearly all the time I have known her. I am sure that she never married any man but McCoy. I was invited to the wedding when she married him … [At one time] she lived just around the corner with the Roberts family, after Mrs. Roberts died she moved with Jane Clark on this street, and has lived there ever since. She visits me, and I know nothing wrong of her since she married McCoy.

Form 3-289c, Randolph Green, 8 February 1917
nearly 63 years old; post-office address, 76 Courtney Ave., Norfolk, Va. … “I knew Humphrey McCoy from the time he came out of the civil war, about 1866 or 1867. I knew all of his marriages. He was married 3 times only. I waited on him when he got married the first time, to Mary Etta Land. She died in Norfolk, Va., of smallpox I heard on Willoughby street, years ago, I was boarding near there. I cannot think of his next wife’s name, but I knew here. I do not know if he was divorced from her, she is dead too. His last wife was the claimant, Delia. He was parted form her, but not divorced, not that I ever heard of. … I think Mary Jane was the name of his middle wife. She did get a divorce from him, I heard, I think.”

Form 3-289c, Shack White, 8 February 1917
nearly 62 years old; post-office address, 937 Winter St., Norfolk, Va.,  … “I have known Delia McCoy for 30 years…. She was single when I first met her. … I was never married to her, never lived with her as her husband. I visited her and she has a son Charley White said to be my son. … I have been married but one time. My wife was named Molly White, she is dead. I married her years ago, when I was a young man. …. I have not been visiting [Delia] since before she married McCoy. Her maiden name was Carver or Cargo. She was living with her brothers when I went to see her. They were nice people. She has lived in Norfolk ever since I have known her … She lived in Norfolk when her son was born.”

Form 3-289c, Eli Carver, 10 February 1917
about 49 years old; post-office address, 4508 Powhatan Ave., (Lamberts Point), Norfolk, Va.; occupation, butcher
“The claimant Delia McCoy is my sister. I do not know her exact age. She is about 51 years old, was born shortly after the Civil War closed, I think. The names of her parents were Eli Carver and Silvia Carver. … [At the time my sister’s son Charlie White was born]she was living in this city, on Princess Anne Ave., with my brothers James and Dan Carver, now dead…. Claimant’s son Chas. White is along about 29 or 30 years old.”

” … A. Either McCoy or the clerk made a mistake. The name is Carver not Cargo, and claimant never had any husband named Cargo. She never had but one husband and that was McCoy. I think McCoy is the one who made the mistake about the name. I did not know McCoy till about the time he married my sister.”

Form 3-289c, Delia McCoy, 8 February 1917
“Q. You gave your maiden name Delia Cargo in your declaration and before me, but it would appear that it was Carver, please explain.
A. Humphrey McCoy gave it in as Cargo, when he got the marriage license, it was so on the certificate, so Mr. Savage, now dead, told me and he said it had to go that way. I told him it was a mistake. I gave you my maiden as Cargo too because it was that way on the certificate, but my correct name before my marriage was Carver. My parents were named Carver, not Cargo, and my brothers were always known as Carver not Cargo. McCoy went with me long enough to know my right name .. .He knew all about my child, I told him about the child and who is father was before I married him. My child was about 4 years old when I married McCoy, but I am not certain.”

Form 3-289c, Harriet Gould, 10 February 1917
near 80 years old; post-office address, 1213 Bolton St., Norfolk, Va.; widow of Essex Gould, not able to work … “I have known the claimant since she was between 11 and 12 years old, I had not known her long when she came to live with me, and she stayed with me till she was grown. I lived on Newton St., then, this city. I have known her all the time since she left my house.

“Q. What was her name when you first knew her.
A.  Delia Carver, her mother was Silvia Carver, she died before the claimant came to my house.
….
“Q. Said Humphrey McCoy stated in his lifetime that the claimant Delia, had a former husband, Shack White, what have you to say to that.
A. She never had a husband before she had McCoy. She had a son by White but was not married to him, never lived with him as his wife. I saw her when her child was about a week old, and I know she was not living with White.

“A. Her brother Eli Carver also came to live with me when she came. She helped me to wash. I could work at that time.”

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On September 15, 1865, Private David Minge was detailed for duty at the Headquarters Post Office at Brazos Santiago, Texas.
— Compiled military service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served with the United States Colored Troops [microform]: 1st through 5th United States Colored Cavalry, 5th Massachusetts Cavalry (Colored), 6th United States Colored Cavalry (1997). Reel 0009 – 1st United States Colored Cavalry: Madry, Andrew – Moseley, Jacob (online at http://www.archive.org/details/compiledmili0009akesunit). Minge’s Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) can be viewed at n963-n986. His orders appear on the last two pages of the document. 


Invalid — 1,059,085 / 1,048,217

C — 2,536,106


Questionnaire (Form 3-173), David Minge,  5 December 1898

405 Church Street, Norfolk, Va.
[married] wife has been dead 8 years
[living children] none

 

Questionnaire (Form 3-493), David Minge, 5 December 1898
405 Church Street, Norfolk, Va.
[current residence, nearest post-office] Sewells Point, P.O. Norfolk Co., Va.
[residence after discharge] same
[post-office] same
[occupation since discharge] laborer on farm
[known by another name] no

 

General Affidavit, Nathan Carr & Isaac Kellum, 19 November 1898
“[Carr], 45 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.; post-office address, 633 Church St., and [Kellum], 74 years old; residence, Norfolk, Va.; post-office address, 165 Newton St. … that they have been well and intimately acquainted with the claimant for over 30 years … the disabilities for which he claims are asthma, disease of lungs, heart and eyes, rheumatism and general debility … that since Sept. 30, 1896, and long prior to that time, claimant has been over two-thirds disabled from the performance of manual labor on account of said disabilities; that at times during that period he has been completely disabled; that they are able to make these statements from the fact that they see the claimant very often and are intimately associated with him and are well acquainted with his physical condition.”

 

Declaration for Pension, David Minze, 5 March 1907
“[H]is several places of residence since leaving the service have been as follows: Norfolk Co., and Norfolk, Va. … That his post-office address is Sewells Point, County of Norfolk, State of Virginia … Also personally appeared W. Creekmore, residing in Norfolk, Va. and Philip Bagnall, residing in Norfolk, Va., [have been acquainted with Minze for] 45 years and 45 years, respectively”
“[verso] name of owner not found”

 

Marriage License [copy], David Menns & Agnes Giles, 21 December 1911
Married 21 December 1911, Norfolk, Virginia. Husband was 70 years old; wife was 69 years old. Both were widowed. Husband was born in Sussex County, Virginia; wife was born in Petersburg, Virginia. Both resided in Norfolk. Husband’s parents were [— ] & Annie Menns; wife’s parents were Leonard & Mary Dangerfield. Husband’s occupation, farmer. Officiant was A. H. Palmer, Minister of Zion Apostolic Union Church; location was Agnes Giles’ house, Norfolk, Virginia.

 

Declaration for Pension, David Minze, 16 May 1912
“[D]eclares that he is 80 years of age, and a resident of Norfolk … that he was born April 1st, 1832, at Sussex County, Virginia … That his post-office address is 506-43rd St., City of Norfolk”

 

Widow’s Application for Accrued Pension, Agnes Minze, 29 April 1913
“[She declared] she is the lawful widow of David Minze … that he died on the 23rd day of April … that she was married to the said David Minze (David Menns) on the 21st day of December 1911; at Norfolk … that her maiden name was Agnes Giles … that her residence is 506-43rd Street, City of Norfolk, County of Norfolk, State of Virginia, and her post-office address is 506-43rd Street, City of Norfolk, County of Norfolk, State of Virginia …
“Also personally appeared Virginia Moseley, residing at Norfolk, Virginia, and Georgia Allen, residing at Norfolk, Virginia … Affiant Moseley was present at wedding and lives only a few doors from them; affiant Allen lived in same house as them for the past six months.”

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David Meredith, Company E

This application includes reports of adultery, illegitimacy, insanity, an anonymous letter to government officials, a house fire, and statements from undertakers, midwives, neighbors, comrades-in-arms, and relatives by marriage.


Invalid — 951,954 / 1,050,073
Widow — 528,953 / 541,653, Hannah Meredith

Marriage License, David Meredith & Hannah Gardener, 25 February 1880
Prince George County, Va. The marriage took place 26 February 1880. David, a 30-year-old widowed laborer, was born to Thos. and Biddy Meredith in Hanover Co., Va. Hannah, 21 years old and single, was born to Shadrick Gardener & Lucy Shands in Sussex Co., Va. The couple lived in Prince George Co., Va.

 

General Affidavit, Hannah Meredith, 2 December 1891
“My son William Meredith was born 22nd of Apr 1880. George L. Meredith was born 1st January 1883. Both of the children are alive.”

 

General Affidavit, William Christian, 4 June 1892
63 years old; resident, City Point, Prince George Co., Va. … “I was with the within mentioned David Meredith when he died…”

 

General Affidavit, Joe Turner, 14 June 1892
28 years old; resident, City Point, Prince George Co., Va. … “I was with the within mentioned David Meredith when he died…”

 

Affidavit, Cupid Stith, 31 December 1896
49 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va. …”I hereby certify that I, Cupid Stith, an undertaker by profession, do personally know that David Meredith died and moreover I helped to bury him but I am not positive as to the exact date of the month but was positive it was in the July of 1891.”

 

Handwritten Letter, Anonymous to Hon. H. Clay Evans, Commissioner of Pensions, 13 February 1901
“I have taken the greatest of pleasure in writing you this letter to let you know that this woman Hannah Meredith is not capable of getting pension and is got my husband too. She is not of the right character because he taken Davy Meredith from his first wife. His first wife was named Martha and she went crazy and went to the silence [sic] and died there and now she has taken my husband. He stays there late hours in the night and leave me alone with the children. She have [sic] got 3 children. The too [sic] little children, the father lives in Newport News and as soon as she gets her pension he is coming up. She has one grown son supporting her and she is got my husband doing the same. Gentlemen, I don’t think she deserves it. She has got 3 men taken [sic] care of her and if you don’t believe it you can send someone here and see for yourself. She is talking about giving my husband a horse and carriage and I won’t stand it. It is a shame she isn’t nothing but and [sic] woman that takes people’s husband.”

 

Statement, R.M. Ford, Postmaster, 1 May 1901
“City Point, Va.
May 1, 1901
Hannah Meredith lives about 300 yds from this office & gets her mail here.”

 

Deposition, Hannah Meredith, 7 June 1901
39 years old; post-office address, City Point, Prince George Co., Va.; washing and ironing … “I was married to the soldier January 26, 1880 by Rev. H.F. Jones at Broadway Landing, Prince George Co., Va. … My maiden name was Hannah Gardiner. That was my first and only marriage …I have sinned but feel that God has pardoned my offenses and I am striving to live the life of a Christian … My husband applied for a pension about 1888 … and died just at the time his pension was to have been allowed.”

 

Deposition, Henry B. Pierce, 8 June 1901
63 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; merchant … “I have known Hannah Meredith for at least twenty-five years. I also knew her husband David Meredith. They lived together in this neighborhood as husband and wife up to the time of his death…. I am unable to say whether the claimant has lived in adulterous co-habitation since the births of the aforesaid illegitimate children. She has worked for my family and I don’t regard her as a vicious woman but rather as one of the unfortunate of her class. She is rather above the average colored persons in intelligence.”

 

Deposition, Hannah Meredith, 11 June 1902
39 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va…. “I am the widow of David Meredith …who died the 21st of June 1891. I don’t know the dates of enlistment and discharge were, and have no means of knowing as soldiers sent his discharge papers some time before his death either to his attorney James Tanner, or to the Department and I have not seen them since.

“My maiden name was Hannah Gardiner. Me and the soldier was married the 26th day of Feby 1880 at Broadway in Prince George Co., Va. by a minister, H.F. James who died about three years ago, I suppose record of our marriage is of record at the Prince George Court House. Me nor the soldier was married prior to our marriage with each other. We lived together from the time we were married up to the date of soldier’s death. As husband and wife we were never separated or divorced. And I have not married since his death. I have been told that soldier lived with a woman here on City Point just at the close of the war by the name of Martha but I never heard it said that they were married. Martha did marry in about the year 1873 a man by the name of Francis Proffit. I never heard what Martha’s other name was.

“Soldier was raised at some place on Hanover County but I don’t know where. I don’t know where any of his relatives is now. He did have a brother by the name of George Meredith who lived on Richmond about fifteen years ago. But I don’t know where he is now. He also had a brother by the name of James. I have not heard from him in 19 years. He was living at same place in Hanover County. At the time, he had some sisters. I never seen them and don’t know where they live. They were married but I don’t remember what their husbands’ names were. I don’t know if any one who is now living who knew my husband before his enlistment or during unless it would be Wm. Green….”

“When my husband died H.F. Jones preached his funeral.  Cubick Stith made the coffin. I had no undertaker. I did have a record of soldier’s death in Family Bible but it was burned in 1893 when my house caught fire. The church has no record of his death.

William Meredith for whom I claim pension was born April the 22 1881, and died the 12th day of January 1895. When William was born I was waited on by Sallie Paraham who died in 1884.  I have no record of his birth or death. And there is no church record of either or record in the cemetery.  Dr. David Roland treated him during his sickness but he, Dr. Roland, died about three or four years ago.
“We held no services over William. I bought his coffin from T.H. Brown, 109 Halifax St. Petersburg, Va. This I bought the next day after he died which was the 13th…”

“Q: You have stated in your declaration for pension filed Oct 10, 1891 that William was born April 26th, 1880 while you now state that he was born April the 22nd 1881. Which one these statements are correct?
A:  He was born April the 22nd 1881. I don’t know how the mistake could have been made.
George R. Meredith for whom I claimed pension was born Feby 1st 1880. He is still living. I was waited on at his birth by Sarah Paraham. There was no others present and don’t know of anyone else would know anything as the date of his birth. There is no church record of the births of any of my children.
“Soldier was disabled for about eight years before he died. The dr. said he had the asthma. He was treated by Dr. Roland. For four years prior to my husband’s death he was totally disabled for the performance of manual labor. He was a man of good habits and was never drunk to my knowledge. I have known him to drink, but it was very little.

Q:  When did illicit conduct of yourself begin after the death of your husband? That is when did you first assume marriage relations with any man after the death of the soldier?
A:  On Jany 17th 1893. But I have not been intimate with but one man and I have not seen him in seven years. The last time I heard of him which was about three or four years ago he lived at Norfolk, Va. His name is Joseph R. Turner.
“No sir. I never assumed marriage relations with William H. Harrison or any other man since the death of my husband, except Turner

Q. Where does Richard J. Chambliss live?
A. He lives at 377 Bank St., Norfolk, Va.
Q. Where does Joseph R. Turner live?
A. He lives in Norfolk, Va some place. I don’t know where but R.J. Chambliss can tell you?”…
Q. Is there a record of death at cemetery where soldier is buried. Or would an engraving on the tombstone show the date of his death?
A. There is no record of those buried kept and there is no tombstone at my husband’s grave….
Q. Why does Wm. Green say your maiden name was Hannah Brooks?
A. I don’t know why unless it was in this way. My grandmother was first married to a Brooks. She have [sic] several daughters by Brooks and I lived at my grandmother’s with her daughters and suppose he thought I was a Brooks also.”

 

Deposition, W.H. Harrison, 12 June 1902
61 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; farmer… “I have known the claimant since she was about ten or twelve years of age. Her maiden name was Hannah Gardner. I have known the soldier ever since just after he was discharged from the service. He has always lived and made City Point and Broadway Landing his home since the war. He did work in Petersburg for a while. I think three years as well as I can remember but while he worked in Petersburg, he made Broadway Landing his home.

“There has not been a year since the war that I have not seen soldier several times. We have never lived further apart then six miles. We never visited each other but i would see him I know at least twice a year while he made his home at Broadway Landing. When he lived at City Point I would see him most every day. I know him up to the time when he died. As I remember he died I think the 21st of June 1891….

“When the soldier died he left two boys. One by the name of William who died I think in the year 1896. I want to be positive as to this, and I know I can’t fix the date or the month. He had another boy by the name of George who is still living but I don’t know how old he is.”

 

Deposition, Richard A. Moody, 12 June 1902
41 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; laborer …”I have known the claimant about ten or twelve years and I am acquainted with the soldier about the same time. I was not here when he died and only know what I have been told about it.  I was not told anything as to the date of his death and know nothing about it except that he died about ten years ago. … When soldier died he had two boys who survived him. One of them whose name was William died some time after his father’s death but I can’t say how long. The other boy’s name is George. He is still living, works somewhere in New York state. I don’t know what his age is.”

 

Deposition, Cupid Stith, 12 June 1902
55 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; carpenter … “I have known the claimant for the past eighteen years. I was personally acquainted with the soldier for about five years before his death, though I had seen him a number of times before this.
“Soldier died June 21st 1891, and I made his coffin June 22nd.
“Q. How do you fix this date?
A. I remember the date by hearing claimant and others speak of it. I kept no record or memorandum of the work done, and depend altogether on my memory and the memory of others in this statement.
Q. You state on a former affidavit that you don’t know the date but know he died in July 1891. While you now state that he died June 21st 1891. Which of these statements are correct? after
A. He died June 21st 1891. The mistake must have been made by Mr. Wiseman in writing my former deposition. I saw soldier after he was dead and helped to bury him. …Soldier’s habits were good and he drank but very little.  I can’t say anything about the illicit conduct of claimant, except that she has two children since the death of soldier.”

 

Deposition, William Green, 12 June 1902
“I don’t know my age but went in the army in 1864 at the age of 22 years”; post-office address, City Point, Va.; laborer … “I have known the claimant since before she was grown. Her maiden name I think was Brooks but I’m not positive as to this. I was not very well acquainted with her until after she was married and came here to City Point to live…..I got acquainted with the soldier in 1864. He and I was in the army together & belonged  to same Co and regiment. We served together and was mustered out together at Santiago Texas. I was paid off at New Orleans and he was paid off here at City Point … Since our discharge we have both lived in this neighborhood all the time, him u to the date of his death, and me up to the present time. I hae known him right along since we were discharged. I never missed a year that I did not see him several times, a good portion of the time we lived close together. And we never have lived further apart than five or six miles since the war…A part of the time we worked together.

“Q. Did soldier live with any woman before his marriage to claimant?
A.  Yes, sir. He lived with one by the name of Martha King, he lived with her five or six years, but they were never married. …
“When soldier died he left two boys. One’s name was George. He is still living and when I heard from him last he was in New York. And the other one died soon after the death of soldier but I cannot fix the year or the date of his death.”
Joe Turner used to go to see Claimant after the death of soldier but I don’t remember whether it was soon after his death or not. I know she has two children born to her since the death of soldier and this is all I know about her illicit conduct.”

 

Deposition, W.H. Harrison, 12 June 1902
61years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; farmer … “I have known the claimant since she was about ten or twelve years of age, her maiden name was Hannah Gardner. I have known the soldier ever since just after he was discharged from the service. He has always lived and made City Point and Broadway Landing his home since the war. He did work in Petersburg for a while. I think three years as well as I can remember, but while he worked in Petersburg, he made Broadway Landing his home.
“There has not been a year since the war that I have not seen soldier several times. We have never lived further apart than six miles. We never visited each other but I would see him I know at least twice a year while he made his home at Broadway Landing. When he lived at City Point I would see him most every day. I knew him up to the time when he died. I saw him after he was dead. As I remember, he died I think the 21st of June 1891.”

 

Deposition, David Hunt, 12 June 1902
“I don’t know my age but I was a young man during the war”; post-office address, City Point, Va.; laborer … “I have known the claimant for about eight years and I have known the soldier since he was mustered out of the service. I have not lived close to him all the time. I have always lived at City Point. And soldier lived here about there of four years after his discharge. He then went to Petersburg and worked in a store for a man by the name of Blake. I did not see him when he worried for Mr. Blake very often. Mr. Blake died and soldier moved to Broadway and after a time he moved back to City Point. I can’t fix date of Mr. Blake’s death.”

 

Deposition, Joe Wooden, 13 June 1902
72 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; laborer. … “I have known claimant right along and lived in the same neighborhood with her since she was a small girl. Her maiden name was Hannah Gardener, she was never married before or since her marriage to David Meredith. I was not at their marriage and don’t remember the date or the year but was living in one quarter of a mile of where they were married. They were married by H.F. James and I first got acquainted with the soldier just at the close of the war and knew him well thereafter up to the date of his death. We always lived in the same neighborhood together we were very intimate and visited each other often.
“Soldier lived with a woman just after the war by the name of Martha but I never understood they were married. I don’t know what her maiden name was. I don’t know anything about her folks and never heard where she came from. As I remember they lived together about three of four years. They then separated and Martha married Frances Proffitt. She afterwards went crazy and died about four years ago in the asylum at Petersburg. I don’t know where Frances Proffitt is but he has been working at Newport News for the last few years on the dock and suppose he is there now.”

 

­Deposition, John G. Munt, 13 June 1902
63 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; farmer … “I have not known the claimant for a number of years but did know her just before and just after she was married to the soldier and I saw her and the soldier married. I think they were married by Hairbert Jones, a colored preacher.
“I knew the soldier soon after he came out of the army and when I first got acquainted with him he was living with a woman by the name of Martha but I never knew what her maiden name was. She was called Martha Meredith. I don’t know where her people lived and don’t know where she came from … [Martha] married a man by the name of Frank Proffitt. The last I heard of him he worked at Newport News and she died in the asylum at Petersburg about three or four years ago … [David Meredith] told me that [his right forefinger] was shot off during the war, he told me that he came from Hanover County, close to some mill but I have forgotten the name of the mill.
“When I knew him his habits were not very good. He would get drunk from time to time. I could not say to what extent he drinks but about like the ordinary colored man he would drink when he could get it. I don’t know what his habits were during the past ten years, or ten years prior to this death.”

 

Deposition, Joe Rose, 13 June 1902
75 years old; post-office address, City Point, Va.; farmer … “I have known the claimant since about the year 1868. We have lived in the same neighborhood together since this time … I got acquainted with soldier about one year after I got acquainted with claimant. He was living at this time at City Point with a woman by the name of Martha …I think she had a sister somewhere in Dinwiddie County …”

 

Deposition, D.J. Hicks, 13 June 1902
“I am 44 years or will be in September”; post-office address, 29 Bowling Brook St., Petersburg Va.; farmer … “I have known the claimant since she was a girl. We were children together. Before she was married we lived within a quarter of a mile of each other. But during the past fifteen or twenty years we have had lived about five miles from each other. But during these latter years I have been at [illegible] at City Point and have seen her often…. I was present when she and the soldier was married I cannot fix the date and have no idea how long it has been. I can remember the soldier from the time when I was a small boy and when he was mustered out of the Army. I have known him ever since and lived with him when I was a boy.
“Soldier was never married before his marriage to claimant. He did live with a woman just after the war by the name of Martha Jenkins but they were never married as I understand. I don’t know where Martha’s people lived but I think they lived in Nottoway County. Soldier and Martha lived together about four years. They then separated and she married a man by the name of Frank Profitt.  She went crazy sometime ago and died at the asylum in Petersburg about three or four years ago.
“Soldier suffered with shortness of breath for years before he died and for two or three years before his death he was totally disabled for the performance of manual labor. He had his right forefinger shot off while in the Army just above the second joint. His habits were good and he did not drink to excess but would take a drink from time to time.”

 

Deposition, Sarah Bowser, 13 June 1902
about 58 years old; post-office address, City Point, Virginia … “I am the wife of Robert Bowser. I have known claimant since she was a small girl and have always lived in the same neighborhood with her. We have been friends and visited each other from time to time. We belong to the same church. She has never married but once. And I was at the wedding at Broadway Landing. She married David Meredith. I don’t remember the date or the year they were married.”
“I don’t know what her maiden name was and I don’t know where her people lived in September that she had a sister that lived in Dinwiddie County somewhere. I have seen her sister but I don’t remember what her name was.
“I don’t remember the date that Martha and David separated and one time after that she married a man by the name of Frank Proffitt and not long ago she died in the asylum at Petersburg.
“I don’t know anything about the births of her Hannah’s children. Her oldest child William was born at Broadway. I was present, She was waited on by Sallie Paraham but I don’t remember the date or the year and have no means of fixing it. Sallie Paraham is dead.”

 

Statement, R.L. Burnett, Special Examiner, Bureau of Pensions, 14 June 1902
“I do certify that I have searched the records of marriage at the Clerk’s Office at Prince George Court House, Prince George County, Va. and find that said records show that Frank Proffit and Martha Jenkins were married Sept 15, 1874.”

 

Statement, Edwin Shelton, Postmaster, 16 June 1902
“Sir,
There are two families of Merediths in this neighborhood. The late Captain E.P. Meredith, who left, two daughters
Mrs. Bob Sydnor of Richmond, Va.,
Mrs. John V. Darricot Atlee, Hanover Co., Va.
[And] Mrs. Mary E. Meredith Ellerson Widow of Thomas E. Meredith, Hanover Co., Va.
Respectfully,
Edwin Shelton, P.M.”

 

Deposition, F.H. Brown. 27 June 1902
38 years old; post-office address, 110 South Lane, Petersburg, Va. … “I am an undertaker. I know the claimant Hannah Meredith. She bought a coffin from me Jany 13, 1896 through a man by the name of Joe Turner. This is the only coffin she ever bought from me. I know the date because it is of record on my ledger.
“I don’t know who the coffin was for but as I remember it was for one of claimant’s children.”

 

Deposition, Hannah Meredith, 27 June 1902
“I have had two children born out of wedlock. One’s name is Josephine. She was born Jany 17, 1893. And the other’s name is Herbert who was born the 15th of Oct 1895.
Manervie Tucker waited on me when both of these children were born. And she is he only one that would know anything about their ages but she is dead. I know this is the ages of these two children because I have a record of it.
“I also have a record of the births of my other two children. Wm. Henry and George R. but this record is kept on a blank sheet in an old American history…the date of publication was torn out.
Q:  You have stated that your illicit conduct began Jany 17, 1893 while you state that Josephine was born Jany 17th 1893. How do you explain this?
A:  I did not understand your question but do now. The illicit conduct began in May or June in 1892 but I can’t fix the date.”

 

Deposition, George Meredith, 27 June 1902
“I was born the 1st day of Feby 1893. My PO Add is City Point Va. I am a laborer. … “The claimant on this case is my mother. I have one brother dead. His name was Wm. He was born April 22, 1881. I know this for the reason that my mother has it of record in an old American history kept by her. William died on the 12th or 13th of Jany 1895 …. I have two half brothers and sister Josephine and Herbert. Josephine was born Jan 17th 1893 and Herbert the 15th of October 1895.
“I had a sister by the name of Mattie but she died before my father died.”

 

Deposition, Jos. R. Turner, 2 September 1902
“I boarded at the house of said Hannah Meredith, off and on about three years, was not there all the time as I ran on a schooner, to New Haven, Conn.
“I believe that I am the father of two of her children Josephine and Herbert, of course it is hard for a man to swear in such a case to swear to being the father of the children,  But I was the only man who had any intercourse with her being that time as  know positively swear that I never married her. He was not known by my name. was called Hannah Meredith. I did not consider myself her husband. We were not recognized as man and wife. Though we sustained relations as man and wife. When we first commenced to have such relations was some time in 1892, don’t know the exact date.
“When was the child Josephine born?
In 1893 in Jany 17th. The schooner on which I was than running was frozen up at City Point where the child was the born.
According to the date of birth of said child the cohabitation of Hannah and myself must have begun in April 1892 though I do not know the month, paid no attention to same.
I have had no sexual relations with claimant since 1895.
“I married another woman in Nov 1898. R.J. Chambliss is my cousin, he is now at City Point, Va. He does not know when my cohabitation with claimant began. He did not know anything about it. He might have suspected it but I never told him. I am not in contact.”

 

Letter from Morris M. Benisch, Attorney, Benisch, Botter & Benisch, 302 Broadway, New York to Pension Bureau, 13 September 1934
“The only living member of the Regiment of which David Meredith was a member, is Mr. Anderson Brown of 508 Carter Street, Petersburg, Virginia.”

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